Home / Health / $ 2,000 fine a day – VICE News

$ 2,000 fine a day – VICE News



New York County is making one of its measles outbreaks again trying to keep infected people at home.

Just two weeks after a judge quashed Rockland County's first attempt to prevent all unvaccinated people from going to public places during the outbreak, the executive power of the County issued a new order Tuesday: anyone with measles will have to stay home and anyone arrived According to the Rockland / Westchester Journal News, contact with them – often between 30 and 50 people in each case – will have to stand at the 39 away from public places or face a fine of $ 2,000 a day.

The county executive, Ed Day, hopes this should end 186 measles cases since October. It is unclear how many people would be immediately affected by the new rule.

The previous rule, published on March 26, applied to all unimmunized people in Rockland County, but mainly affected the ultra-Orthodox Jewish population who was hesitant about vaccination. The parents sued, arguing that the ban was "capricious", preventing their children from getting an education and that the epidemic did not correspond to the serious emergency described by the Day. Since the ban was lifted on April 5, the county's 329,000 recorded 20 new cases of measles. The county also appealed the judge's decision.

In the meantime, the new order will also prevent unvaccinated children from returning home if they reside in certain postal codes, but will allow exceptions for children with religious or medical reasons not to receive the highly effective vaccine. against measles, mumps and rubella.

New York County is making one of its measles outbreaks again trying to keep infected people at home.

Just two weeks after a judge quashed Rockland County's first attempt to prevent all unvaccinated people from going to public places during the outbreak, the executive power of the County issued a new order Tuesday: anyone with measles will have to stay home and anyone arrived According to the Rockland / Westchester Journal News, contact with them – often between 30 and 50 people in each case – will have to stand at the 39 away from public places or face a fine of $ 2,000 a day.

The county executive, Ed Day, hopes this should end 186 measles cases since October. It is unclear how many people would be immediately affected by the new rule.

The previous rule, published on March 26, applied to all unimmunized people in Rockland County, but mainly affected the ultra-Orthodox Jewish population who was hesitant about vaccination. The parents sued, arguing that the ban was "capricious", preventing their children from getting an education and that the epidemic did not correspond to the serious emergency described by the Day. Since the ban was lifted on April 5, the county's 329,000 recorded 20 new cases of measles. The county also appealed the judge's decision.

In the meantime, the new order will also prevent unvaccinated children from returning home if they reside in certain postal codes, but will allow exceptions for children with religious or medical reasons not to receive the highly effective vaccine. against measles, mumps and rubella.

"We are going to redefine the strategies at every opportunity, no matter what is presented to us," Day said at a press conference announcing the decision. "We can not afford to wait and wait for a court appearance."

The redeveloped emergency stop is even less severe than the one put in place by New York City last week, which only applied to the orthodox Jewish neighborhoods of Brooklyn. This order required all unvaccinated persons to be vaccinated or fined $ 1,000. The parents have since sued the city, arguing that the rule violated their religious freedoms. Similar to the Rockland County trial, parents also say the outbreak has not reached the level of an emergency, according to Fox News.

Thanks to the police powers conferred on them by the constitution, states and cities have the opportunity to develop their own mandatory vaccination programs as they see fit. This was reaffirmed in a Supreme Court judgment rendered in 1905 in the Jacobson v. Massachusetts, which had determined that the state could require that its residents receive the smallpox vaccine provided they protect the public.

At the time, the cities of Massachusetts sentenced a person to a fine of $ 5 if they failed to be vaccinated against smallpox during an epidemic. Henning Jacobson, an unvaccinated pastor from Cambridge, sued the US $ 5 fine after being discovered, and the Supreme Court ruled that the city was his right.


Source link