25-year-old teacher has "suicide sickness" after "failed cannula insertion"



A woman struggling with a "suicidal illness" said that the excriminating pain she suffers every day makes her feel "stabbed by a hundred pieces of burning glass."

Amy Pohl, a former Rugby teacher in Warwickshire, was diagnosed with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) last January.

The doctors do not know what is the cause of the disease, although Miss Pohl's family claims that she has developed this disease in her left arm as a result of an infection in her hand.

The 25 year old woman can no longer walk, is bedridden and needs to be fed through a tube after eating has become so painful that she has lost 25 pounds.

CRPS is called suicide sickness because of the number of people dying.

Miss Pohl even tried to commit suicide last year because of the pain described as being as intense as a birth, but 24 hours a day.

Speaking of her condition, Ms. Pohl said, "The only way to describe the pain in my arm is like stabbing me with a hundred shards of burning glass.

Amy Pohl (photo) has developed a

The 25-year-old woman faces a two-year stay in the hospital after the state of health made her unable to use her legs or swallow her , forcing her to be fed by means of a tube. She is photographed with her mother Jo, her father Dave and her dog Bessler

Amy Pohl (left) developed a "suicide disease" after an alleged attempt to insert the cannula would have left her in an unbearable pain. She is facing a two year stay at the hospital after the state of health prevented her from using her legs or swallowing her. She is well represented with her mother Jo, her father Dave and her dog Bessler

Miss Pohl's infected hand is illustrated after the supposed insertion of the cannula. She thinks she has touched a bone or a nerve, which has caused a swelling of the hand.

The picture shows Miss Pohl's hand after drainage of an abscess. She was hospitalized for her pain weeks later

Miss Pohl's infected hand is shown on the left after the supposed insertion of the cannula. She thinks it may have touched a bone or a nerve, which caused a swelling of the hand. The picture on the right shows Miss Pohl's hand after drainage of an abscess. She was hospitalized for her pain weeks later

"I can not even kiss dad and mom anymore. I fight even when people breathe my skin because of it.

The intense and constant pain also deprived Miss Pohl of her independence. "I can not do anything for myself," she said.

The infection would have been caused after the failure of cannulation – the insertion of an IV tube into the veins – when she was at the Coventry University Hospital in November 2017. She is now hospitalized since October.

Miss Pohl facing the next two years at the hospital, her family hopes to raise £ 100,000 so that she can benefit from rehabilitation treatment and physiotherapy.

"Before, I was so independent, but now I can not dress myself alone nor wash myself. I can not even go back to bed.

Miss Pohl says the pain has spread from the arm to the abdomen and has finally made swallowing too painful to bear.

"When I eat, I feel like I'm pricking my abdomen with a hot knife," she says. "I currently manage about 200 calories per mouth and per tube."

As if her ordeal were not serious enough, Miss Pohl is terrified, she will only get worse. "I'm constantly worried that CRPS will spread to another member," she said.

"What makes me move forward is to go back to work. I loved my job so much. It was my life, so I just want to start doing what I love again. & # 39;

On the photo before the ordeal where her dog was a puppy, Miss Pohl was "so independent" and enjoyed being a teacher

Now bedridden, Miss Pohl can not wash or dress and is even unable to turn around in bed. She lives in fear that it will get worse

Photo taken left before the ordeal when her dog was a puppy, Miss Pohl was "so independent" and enjoyed being a teacher. Now bedridden (right), Miss Pohl can not wash or dress and is even unable to turn around in bed. She lives in fear that it will get worse

Bessler's visits allowed Miss Pohl to continue. The 25-year-old suffers from PTSD after an unsuccessful suicide attempt in May that left her in a psychological unit. Unable to get out of the pain, she overdosed. Bessler "licks her face" when she has flashbacks

Bessler's visits allowed Miss Pohl to continue. The 25-year-old suffers from PTSD after an unsuccessful suicide attempt in May that left her in a psychological unit. Unable to get out of the pain, she overdosed. Bessler "licks her face" when she has flashbacks

Miss Pohl began to feel exhausted in November 2017 and was diagnosed with croup in the adult, an infection that affects the trachea, respiratory tract and voice mail.

After the antibiotics failed to eliminate the infection, she was admitted to the hospital in December for further tests.

Later, she had an almost fatal reaction to her medication and was taken to intensive care.

About a week later, Miss Pohl developed an infection after the failure of the cannula insertion, which caused swelling of the hand and wrist.

"I remember the cannula that was really hurting when she came in," she says. "I do not know if it touched a bone or a nerve.

Miss Pohl then needed a surgery under general anesthesia to drain the abscess.

In January of last year, Ms. Pohl's daily pain meant that she was back in the hospital and under intravenous infusion.

A few weeks later, she was diagnosed with CRPS – a severe, debilitating, persistent pain caused by an injury.

The exact prevalence of CRPS is not clear, however, according to one study, nearly one in 3,800 people in the UK would have the disease each year.

In the United States, between 5.5 and 26.2 people suffer from CRPS per 100,000 population each year.

"When the doctors told me that I was suffering from CRPS, I was so happy to have been diagnosed because I had the impression that somebody was suffering from CRPS. One believed me, but I was so devastated because I knew there was no cure, "said Miss Pohl.

"Nobody really knows about the condition – including medical experts."

Although relieved to have had a diagnosis, Ms. Pohl's mental health deteriorated. "I became more and more depressed after the diagnosis," she said.

"I just wanted to find my old life again. I could not do anything for myself. I could not go out because a slight breeze touching my arm caused excruciating pain.

"I could not sleep, I was doing about three hours a night. I had also developed post-traumatic stress disorder and experienced flashbacks.

Desperate, Miss Pohl even asked for the amputation of her arm, but was warned that she was likely to spread to other members.

"Meanwhile, my mother was undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy after being diagnosed with stage four lymphoma, so I was very low," she added.

On the photo, the day of her graduation, Miss Pohl "wants to regain her old life" and suffered from an intense depression as a result of her diagnosis.

Infected and swollen hand of Miss Pohl after cannula failure is illustrated

Miss Pohl, photographed left on the day of her graduation, "wants to regain her old life" and suffered from an intense depression as a result of her diagnosis. His hand infected after the cannula failure is shown right

Miss Pohl is photographed before the test with her parents and grandparents Sandra and John Collins. The family thinks her problems may have started since the failure of the cannula attempt and speak to a lawyer specializing in the possibility of suing

Miss Pohl is photographed before the test with her parents and grandparents Sandra and John Collins. The family thinks her problems may have started since the failure of the cannula attempt and speak to a lawyer specializing in the possibility of suing

Things got dramatically worse in May 2018, when Miss Pohl planned to commit suicide.

After a visit to a psychological unit, Ms. Pohl was allowed to return home.

Despite taking about 40 tablets a day and administering oral morphine 12 times a day, nothing seemed to be able to relieve the pain.

In October 2018 Miss Pohl was transported to Coventry University Hospital and has not been home since.

Miss Pohl, previously active, now supports a cocktail of painkillers to spend the day

In the photo, with her parents and dog, Miss Pohl has not been home since Coventry University Hospital since last October.

Miss Pohl (left), who was previously active, now supports a cocktail of painkillers to cross the day. On the photo just before her dramatic decline in health with her parents and dog, Miss Pohl has not returned from the Coventry University Hospital since last October.

Miss Pohl took part in outdoor activities, but now must spend two years in the hospital

Miss Pohl took part in outdoor activities, but now must spend two years in the hospital

Miss Pohl's family thinks her problems may have started since the unsuccessful cannula attempt and speak to a lawyer specializing in the possibility of filing a lawsuit.

The family claims about that time, following an MRI examination of Ms. Pohl's hand, she underwent a four-and-a-half-hour operation under general anesthesia to remove a piece of cannula d & # 39; # 39; origin.

This operation proved useless because nothing was found.

Around the same time, he was diagnosed with a functional neurological disorder, a set of common and disabling neurological symptoms, such as tremors and cognitive problems.

"I was falling and had brain fog, but I was reducing it to pain in my arm and I did not want to worry anyone," said Miss Pohl.

& # 39; I fell down the stairs. I was telling my legs to move but it was like they were not listening.

"Now I can not feel my legs or use them anymore. You can develop an FND as a result of chronic pain.

"Your brain is failing to send the correct messages to other parts of your body."

Miss Pohl (previously photographed with her father) wants to educate people about chronic pain disorders

Miss Pohl (previously photographed with her father) wants to educate people about chronic pain disorders

Miss Pohl's family is desperately trying to raise £ 100,000 for treatment in a STEPS Special Rehabilitation Unit in Sheffield, as well as funds for further physiotherapy.

"Unfortunately, this hospital does not have the necessary resources and I do not have beds for treatment elsewhere in the NHS, so that's the only option," she said. .

"It's a shame that you have to pay so much for a treatment because if you think about it, I cost a lot more at the NHS if I stay in this bed for a year or two."

Despite all that she has endured, Miss Pohl has continued to pursue her activities, it is her Hungarian dog Vizsla Bessler, who is allowed to visit him at the hospital.

"Bessler has helped me so much," she says. "I have since his childhood and he is part of our family.

"When I have bad flashbacks due to PTSD, he licks my face and helps me calm down. I do not know what I would do without him.

A spokesperson for the Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust teaching hospitals added, "The complex regional pain syndrome is an extremely complicated disease that meets many needs.

"In these circumstances, we do not consider that the patient's interest is to comment on his treatment, past or present.

"The Trust will always explore all options available to patients to ensure they receive the best care possible.

Donate for Miss Pohl's treatment here.

Anyone seeking help can phone the Samaritans for free at 116 123 or visit Samaritans.org

WHAT IS COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME?

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a condition that causes extreme discomfort that does not worsen.

It usually affects a single arm or leg following an anterior injury, such as a fracture or sprain without nerve damage, or a nerve injury of a limb.

The body's reaction is much stronger than usual and often causes more severe pain than the initial injury.

The exact prevalence of CRPS is not clear, however, according to one study, nearly one in 3,800 people in the UK would have the disease each year.

In the United States, between 5.5 and 26.2 people suffer from CRPS per 100,000 population each year.

What are the symptoms?

Pain is the main symptom, which can be a burning sensation, stabbing, stinging or beating.

The affected limb is usually sensitive to touch, even the clothes cause agony.

CRPS also causes swelling that can lead to stiffness, limb weakness and jerky movements. The joints may also look redder or warmer than usual.

Many patients with CRPS become anxious or depressed.

What are the causes of CRPS?

The cause of CRPS is unclear, but it is thought that the nerves of the affected area become more sensitive, which can alter the pathways of pain between the limb and the brain.

Rarely, a stroke or multiple operations on the limb may be to blame.

In one out of 10 cases, there is no obvious cause.

What are the treatment options for patients?

There is no single treatment. Therapies aim to maintain movement through rehabilitation and pain relief.

This may include physiotherapy and occupational therapy, coping strategies and medications.

Source: Arthritis Research UK


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