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A girl invents the stuffed IV blanket to hide a medical bag filled with saline / chemo



A 12-year-old girl with an immune disorder invents the infusion bag stuffed bag so hospitalized children are less afraid

  • A girl has developed a way to conceal IV drips and alleviate patients' fears
  • Ella Casano developed the Medi Teddy, a stuffed toy to hide an intravenous infusion bag
  • Ella, 12, from Connecticut, has an immune disorder and needs intravenous infusions
  • She wanted to improve the time spent in the hospital for children like her
  • A GoFundMe page has been created and she plans to donate 500 Medi Teddy to children.

A young girl has devised a new way to hide intravenous infusions and alleviate patients' fears.

Ella Casano, 12, from Connecticut, was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease called idiopathic thrombocytopenia (Idiopathic Purpura) five years ago.

This condition can lead to easy or excessive bruising and bleeding, due to unusually low platelet levels, which helps to coagulate the blood.

Ella Casano, 12 (photo), invented a stuffed envelope to hide an IV line attached to a drip to make the hospital a less scary place for children like her.

Ella Casano, 12 (photo), invented a stuffed envelope to hide an IV line attached to a drip to make the hospital a less scary place for children like her.

Ella had IV infusions every six to eight weeks because of her condition. Sometimes she feared the process and developed the Medi Teddy, a stuffed animal placed around the bag to hide it.

In a statement posted on her website, she said, "When I had my first drip, I was surprised and a little intimidated by the appearance of the amount of tubing and d & # 39; 39 medical equipment on my intravenous.

"By seeing more and more children experience the same feelings, I have taken a closer interest in creating a more user-friendly experience for young patients on intravenous drips. So I created Medi Teddy. I hope Medi Teddy helps you as much as it helps! & # 39;

The back of the pouch is knitted to allow nurses and doctors to track the amount of medication the patient receives.

Ella made a number of prototypes and gave them to her nurses so that they could comment on how to improve it.

Subsequently, she studied business projects at school for an independent study and designed hers for Medi Teddy.

She developed Medi Teddy because she felt slightly intimidated by all the tubes and equipment attached to her identification pole.

She developed Medi Teddy because she felt slightly intimidated by all the tubes and equipment attached to her identification pole.

Ella Casano

Ella Casano

Ella Casano, 12, from Connecticut, was diagnosed with autoimmune disease called idiopathic thrombocytopenia, purpura, and IV infusions every six to eight weeks.

They are now filling out the documents to make the company a non-profit organization.

Her mother, Meg, told CNN her health: "It's when her body attacks and destroys her own platelets. This puts her at a higher risk of bleeding or hurting more than most people.

"So she cut a stuffed animal and used a hot glue gun to make her first Teddy Medi," Casano said.

Last weekend, they launched a GoFundMe page so she could give 500 Medi Teddys to kids like her.

The account raised $ 17,002 on a goal of $ 5,000.

"The response was great: her nurses tried the prototypes and gave suggestions.

"And we think we are ready to produce a really great product that can help hundreds of kids."

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