A staggering experience suggests that multiple realities may exist at the same time



A staggering experience suggests that multiple realities may exist at the same time

  • A thoughtful thought experiment was finally tested in the laboratory
  • The result proves that two subjects with opposite observations may be right
  • Results challenge the fundamental nature of how science is conducted

In a new article, researchers say that they have proven that two realities can exist at a time, at least as far as the quantum world is concerned.

To study their hypothesis, researchers from the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck in Austria have addressed one of the most confusing thought experiments in the world, called "the friend of Wigner. "

The experiment, named after its ancestor, the Nobel laureate physicist Eugene Wigner, was postulated in 1961 and involves two people observing the same thing – in this case, a photon.

In the most recent studies, particles have been named (illustrated above) to represent fictitious observers in the Wigner Friend experiment. In this, a person observes the photon and sends it in a vertical or horizontal state, while Wigner, who is outside the lab, performs a test to prove that the photon is still in a state of superposition.

In the most recent studies, particles have been named (illustrated above) to represent fictitious observers in the Wigner Friend experiment. In this, a person observes the photon and sends it in a vertical or horizontal state, while Wigner, who is outside the lab, performs a test to prove that the photon is still in a state of superposition.

When the photon is observed, it appears in a horizontal or vertical state, but according to quantum mechanics, before this observation is made, it exists in a state of "superposition", which means that it is at the times in both states – horizontal and horizontal. vertical.

In the Wigner experiment, a person from a laboratory observes the photon, sending it to the vertical or horizontal state, while Wigner, who is outside the lab, performs a simple test called "interference experiment" to prove that the photon is still in a state of superposition.

In the thought experiment, it is possible to prove that both observations, and therefore the two realities that they represent, are true simultaneously.

Although Wigner's friend has long been an intriguing thought experience, advances in quantum mechanics and physics have allowed researchers to test the theory – and that's exactly what Massimiliano Proietti's Heriot-Watt University of Edinburgh and his colleagues did.

Using six entangled photons – particles of light whose fate is linked – Proietti and his colleagues were able to replicate the results of Friend de Wigner.

The experiment implies that two people observe the same thing - in this case, a single photon. Stock image

The experiment implies that two people observe the same thing – in this case, a single photon. Stock image

Once observed, photons existed in a state of polarization, but during tests using interference experiments, it was concluded that photons still existed in a state of superposition.

The implications of the study not only confirm the long-debated experience, but challenge the fundamentals of how observations are made.

"The scientific method is based on facts, established by repeated measurements and agreed universally, regardless of who has observed them," says Proietti in an article published in the pre-printed newspaper AirXiv.

"In quantum mechanics, the objectivity of the observations is not so clear."

However, if these facts can neither be proven nor credible, nor both, as advocated by Proietti's work, then science itself may have to change.

WHAT IS QUANTUM ENTANGULATION?

In quantum physics, entangled particles remain bound so that the actions performed by one affect the behavior of the other, even if they are separated by enormous distances.

This means that if you measure "up" the spin of a photon from an entangled pair, the spin of the other, measured a moment later, will be "down" – even if the two are on either side of the world.

Entanglement occurs when part of the particles physically interacts.

A breakthrough in testing Einstein's "spooky remote action" could pave the way for ultra-secure quantum communication. Scientists have studied the possibility of using pairs of photons to form a bond over large distances, in a quantum entanglement. Artist's impression

In quantum physics, entangled particles remain bound, so that actions performed by one affect the behavior of the other, even if they are separated by enormous distances (printing from one to another). artist).

For example, a laser beam triggered through a certain type of crystal may cause the division of individual light particles into entangled photon pairs.

The theory that has so disturbed Einstein is also called "remote phantasmagoric action".

Einstein was not satisfied with the theory as it suggested that information could travel faster than light.

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