An unusual "aurora" of the fire-breathing dragon illuminates the sky during the last aurora borealis



A fire-breathing dragon appears in an incredible representation of the aurora borealis while scientists claim that aurora activity is unusually high during a period of relative calm on the sun's surface.

  • The photo shows a strange resemblance to a green dragon hovering over the sky
  • The dragon's head is bordered by a purple hue that represents angelr and add a language
  • The photographer's mother is represented as a tiny silhouette looking at the dragon
  • The Northern Light "Emissions" were more frequent this month due to the lack of sunspots

A bright green dragon emerging from an amazing Northern Lights show was captured on a beautiful photograph taken in Iceland.

The image, shared online by NASA, shows the photographer's mother standing on a snowy floor looking at the mythological creature.

The fluorescent green light seems to represent the entire body of a dragon that expands to fill the sky, wings spread on either side.

The northern lights, or aurora borealis, are created by electrically charged sun particles that hit the earth's atmosphere.

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  A bright green dragon emerging from an amazing Northern Lights show was captured on a beautiful photograph taken in Iceland. The image, shared online by NASA, shows the photographer's mother standing on snowy ground looking at the mythological creature (photo).

A bright green dragon emerging from an amazing Northern Lights show was captured on a beautiful photograph taken in Iceland. The image, shared online by NASA, shows the photographer's mother standing on snowy ground looking at the mythological creature (photo).

The "head" of the dragon is visible to the left. The distinctly shredded outline of the head, mouth and tongue is clearly delineated at the top.

A purple hue helps to crown the outline of the creature's head with a tongue coming out of its mouth.

A spokesman for NASA said, "Have you ever seen a dragon in the sky?"

Although real flying dragons do not exist, a huge dragon-shaped aurora has developed in the sky over Iceland.

"The aurora was caused by a hole in the solar corona that expelled charged particles in a solar wind, as a result of an interplanetary magnetic field changing to the Earth's magnetosphere.

"When some of these particles then hit the earth's atmosphere, they excited atoms that then emitted light: auroras."

Aurora borealis, or aurora borealis, is created by electrically charged sun particles hitting the Earth's atmosphere (image in stock)

The northern lights, or aurora borealis, are created by the electrically charged particles of the sun striking the atmosphere of the Earth (image in stock)

The dawn of the dragon appeared at a time of low activity of the sun, which feeds the aurora borealis.

Stars emit radiation and charged particles that interfere with the planet's magnetic field and create dancing lights in the northern and southern regions of the world.

The northern lights are called the northern lights and the aurora borealis are officially known as the southern lights.

"No sunspot has appeared on the Sun until now in February, which somewhat surprised the many colorful auroral activities this month," NASA added.

WHAT IS AURORAS AND WHAT IS TRIGGERING THE GREAT NATURAL DISPLAYS?

The northern and southern lights are natural sunglasses that are triggered in our atmosphere, also known as the aurora.

There are two types of Aurora – Aurora Borealis, which means "North Dawn" and Aurora Australis, "South Dawn".

Screens come on when electrically charged sun particles enter the Earth's atmosphere.

There are two types of Aurora - Aurora Borealis (archival photo), which means "northern dawn" and Aurora Australis, "southern dawn". Screens come on when electrically charged sun particles enter the earth's atmosphere.

There are two types of Aurora – Aurora Borealis (archival photo), which means "northern dawn" and Aurora Australis, "southern dawn". Screens come on when electrically charged sun particles enter the earth's atmosphere.

Usually, particles, sometimes called solar storms, are deflected by the Earth's magnetic field.

But during strong storms, they enter the atmosphere and collide with gas particles, including hydrogen and helium.

These collisions emit light. Auroral screens appear in many colors, although pale green and pink are common.

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