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Another Dem is opposed to Pelosi



The presidential road has slightly increased for Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia's Alesandro PelosiL's plot surrounds Nancy Pelosi vote Democrats criticize Brady's new tax package Demy's new lawmaker announces new members support Pelosi PLUS (D-Calif.) Wednesday when another Democrat announced his opposition to the long-time party leader.

representative Ron KindRonald (Ron) James KindThe Michigan Dem will not support. Pelosi Left wants a vote on the single-payer bill in the new Farmers' Bill of Agriculture Congress should take advantage of the moment. MORE (D), a 11-member Wisconsin legislature, said he voted against Pelosi's candidacy for party leadership two years ago and plans to do the same in January.

"I've always said that we desperately needed new leadership from both sides as we move into the new Congress," Kind told The Hill.

A prominent Democrat assistant fought back, saying that Kind had supported the main Pelosi-Reps lieutenants. Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerIntrigue surrounds Nancy Pelosi vote Hoyer receives a boost from House Dems before the leadership vote What insurgents can learn from the Democracy Study Group MORE (D-Md.) And James Clyburn (D-S.C.) – who have also headed the party for more than a decade.

"This reasoning falls flat considering the vote of the Kind representative for Hoyer and Clyburn today," said the assistant, referring to Wednesday's leadership votes on Capitol Hill.

"Kind is even on Hoyer's letter, so he is very comfortable with an older man who stays on the spot."

For Kind, the move is not totally unexpected. Former president of the NDP coalition, Kind had supported Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanIntrigue surrounds Nancy Pelosi vote GM attracts Washington's anger with new layoffs Dems plays "Let's make a deal" with Nancy Pelosi MORE'S (D-Ohio) unsuccessful challenge of Pelosi in 2016. And he was one of four Democrats to oppose Pelosi during the Speaker's vote in the House in January 2017.

Nevertheless, Kind has largely escaped the radar this year as the struggle for Pelosi's future heated up and split the party into factional duels.

Kind did not endorse a letter, organized by a small but determined insurgent group, seeking to block Pelosi's bid for the president's mallet, which she held between 2007 and 2007. 2011. And he refused to play his hand earlier in the month, claiming that he intended to meet Pelosi.

All that was said at their meeting, which took place before the Thanksgiving break, did not shake Kind's belief that Democrats need a host of cool faces at the party's summit. And he predicted that Pelosi's critics would have the numbers this year to oust him after 15 years at the helm.

"I think she still has a computational problem to reach 218," said Kind.

Pelosi has taken a step forward with some of his first detractors in recent weeks, winning them on his side after offering warnings to committees and promised to prioritize the preferred legislation. However, Kind warned that Pelosi would have nothing to offer, which could change his mind.

"It's not the game I play," he said.

These comments came just hours after House Democrats voted overwhelmingly to nominate Pelosi for the presidency of the next Congress. The vote was unbalanced from 203 to 32, leaving Pelosi supporters confident that it can mobilize additional support over the five weeks remaining before the vote of the Speaker of the House in the House.

The insurgents saw the vote from a different angle, their purpose being simply to demonstrate that Pelosi did not have the support of 218 Democrats – the number she will need to win the hammer on the ground.

Ryan said that he considered the count as a victory for critics in spreading this message. And the emergence of Kind as a sub-radar opponent suggests that other anti-Pelosi could remain silent – for now.

Elected Representative Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordNevada New Members Poll 2019: Rosen leads Heller by 4 points in the Nevada Senate race Bloomberg quietly spends millions on TV commercials MORE (D-Nev.) On Wednesday refused to say how he voted in the private ballot – or how he would vote in the general assembly in January.

"In January, it will be known," he said.


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