Boy from York County with Two Unusual Conditions Among Those Raising Awareness About Rare Disease Day



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Thursday is Rare Disease Day, designed to raise public awareness of rare diseases, treatment and research. A 2-year-old boy from York County lives with two rare diseases. Camden is a familiar face of WGAL because his grandfather, Dave Rupp, is the News 8.Camden photographer suffers from a congenital stenosis of the pyramidal diaphragm. It was at that time that, when he was newborn, he could not breathe, "Ashley Martz Camden is another ailment.This is a problem of panhypopituitarism that prevents his body from making hormones. "He takes daily injections of hormones. He takes daily steroids, and he has undergone numerous surgeries and hospitalizations, "said Martz.Camden's troubles require the family to be ready to cope with any situation." Diseases can really upset our days or our weeks managing his care and then trying to avoid any type of hospitalization for him, "said Martz, his family is grateful to Rare Disease Day for ensuring that Camden gets himself The family hopes someday that it will encourage them to help someone else. "Whether it is a family member or patients themselves, it helps to be able to go out and convey the message that you may be rare, but that you are not alone sure that you are traveling through the rare disease, "Martz said.

Thursday is Rare Disease Day, which aims to raise public awareness of rare diseases, treatment and research.

A 2-year-old boy from York County lives with two rare diseases. Camden is a familiar face of WGAL because his grandfather is News 8 photographer Dave Rupp.

Camden suffers from congenital stenosis with nasal pyramidal opening.

"That's when, as a newborn, he could not breathe through his nose," said Ashley Martz, Camden's mother.

The other Camden disease is panhypopituitarism, which prevents one's body from making hormones.

"He takes daily hormonal injections, takes steroids daily, and has had many surgeries and hospitalizations," said Martz.

Martz said Camden's troubles require the family to be ready to deal with any situation.

"Diseases in general can really upset our days or our weeks by managing our care and then trying to avoid any type of hospitalization for him," Martz said.

Martz said she and her family were grateful for Rare Disease Day, which made Camden feel special. The family hopes that one day it will inspire them to help someone else.

"Whether it's a family member or patients themselves to help him get out and get the message out that you may be rare, but you're not alone in the journey of your rare disease, "said Martz.

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