Exercise at night is better for you



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What is the best time to train?

Experts have been debating this issue for years, but new data suggests that doing night training may be better for you than hurrying in the morning.

In two new mouse studies, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and the University of California at Irvine have found improvements in the performance of rodents at night.

Until now, experts considered that the timing of food intake was the most important factor for improving athletic abilities, but, as stressed Paolo Sassone-Corsi of the University of California, the most conducive time for exercise is relatively unexplored subject.

Both teams analyzed data collected from tests performed on mice running on treadmills.

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science examined the performance of mice exercising at different intensities at different times of the day and noted a 50% increase in their overall performance at night.

Meanwhile, the California team took a different approach by observing changes in the metabolism of mice occurring during exercise at different times of the day. Both teams came to the same conclusions: the evening seemed like the best time to exercise, at least for the mice, and it boils down to the circadian clock.

"Circadian rhythms dominate everything we do," Sassone-Corsi said. "Previous studies in our lab have suggested that at least 50% of our metabolism is circadian and that 50% of our body's metabolites oscillate. Circadian cycle function meaning that exercise would be one of the things that have an impact. "

Sassone-Corsi added that the test results "clearly indicate that time of day is a critical factor to amplify the beneficial impact of exercise on both metabolic pathways of homeostasis. skeletal muscle and systemic energy ".

However, both teams of researchers pointed out that, although circadian clocks have been preserved throughout the evolution, it is not as simple to translate these findings for humans. Lifestyle can come into play.

"You can be a morning person or a night person, and these things have to be taken into account," says Sassone-Corsi.

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