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A scientist says that 30 minutes of your time twice a year could help cure Alzheimer's disease




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"If you want to do something to hasten the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, join the register of brain health," said Michael W. Weiner, M.D.

Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), Weiner is the principal investigator of the Brain Health Registry (BHR) and the Alzheimer's funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (DIDI): a 14-year longitudinal study involving more than 1,500 subjects at 60 sites in the United States and Canada and one of the largest observational studies in the world using MRI, PET and biomarkers to study Alzheimer's disease.

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Dr. Michael Weiner, Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and Principal Investigator of the Brain Health Registry (BHR).

Photo provided by the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

Weiner launched BHR five years ago as a low-cost scalable approach in response to the "very expensive and high-tech approach" of ADNI for the study of the disease. d & # 39; Alzheimer's. The BHR brain questionnaires and tests are used as tools to help researchers identify normal elderly people at risk of cognitive decline and dementia, and provide data to facilitate the work of other researchers.

"I have been doing research for 50 years. I have been doing research on Alzheimer's for 25 years, "he said. "The overall goal of our field is to identify people at risk of developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia and to help develop treatments to prevent them. But research is slowing down because we do not recruit enough volunteers to carry them out. We want everyone. We want African-Americans, Spaniards and Asians. We want blue-collar workers, white-collar workers, workers, high school graduates, college graduates and graduates of higher education. We want our registry to look like America.

More than 62,000 participants have already registered for the OHR and scientists hope to increase this number to 100,000 or more this year. Through a series of brain questionnaires and tests that take about 30 minutes twice a year, the OHR can observe and study changes in brain health over time, and then use this information to accelerate research on the health of the brain. brain. & nbsp; Anyone over the age of 18 can join HRE, including healthy people, people with health problems or memory, people with brain disease and people with and without a history of illness brain in their family.

Since October 2014, when the BHR began inviting participants twice a year to complete follow-up questionnaires and brainstorming, more than half of the registered participants returned at least once, helping researchers to observe the results. trends in brain health that evolve slowly over the years.

A web-based observational study and the first large-scale project in the field of neuroscience that leverages online capabilities in this way, the BHR was designed to capture large amounts of data enabling researchers to Identify, evaluate and monitor cognitive processes more effectively. changes associated with the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cerebral aging.

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In addition to long-term data collection, BHR has directed more than 23,000 interested participants to further research studies on brain health, aging and dementia, including clinical trials.

"We want everyone to join the brain health registry for a variety of reasons," said Weiner. "I focus mainly on the elderly and people over 60, but we collaborate a lot. We will provide our data to any investigator who wishes. And people are interested in all kinds of things. "

Weiner said that other researchers and institutions can and have used the data for their own research in areas such as sleep disorders and cognition, autism, and the aging process in general. "We are also interested in seeing what the natural aging process looks like, and the only way to do that is to compare young people to older people," Weiner said. "With the register of brain health, we can do it."

UCSF researchers are sensitive to confidentiality issues and the identities of participants are never disclosed without the consent of the individual, Weiner said. And since the BHR is supervised by UCSF, all its study activities are approved and regulated by the UCSF Institutional Review Committee (IRB), or Ethics Committee.

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HRE participants complete online questionnaires and tests that, over time, provide researchers with information and therefore the ability to track changes in the health, lifestyle, and cognitive function of an individual. individual. These changes could be important indicators of a person's brain health and could help identify and best recruit ideal candidates for medical research and future clinical trials.

Tens of millions of Americans suffer from brain diseases and the number of participants in BHR is increasing every day. "The more people who will accept filling out questionnaires and brain tests, the more information collected will be valuable and the greater the impact researchers will have in accelerating the discovery of treatments for brain diseases. such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, etc. "Weiner said.

He added that he hoped that by creating a large database (at least 100,000) of pre-qualified potential participants, researchers "could conduct clinical trials of neurological diagnostics and treatments more quickly," he said. better and more innovative ".

"We are a large pool of potential participants in clinical trials. Brain tests and questionnaires can help identify those who might benefit from diagnostic tools or potential therapies, "he said. "This group of shortlisted candidates can take years of testing. When trials are faster, better and cheaper, researchers can test more theories and try new therapeutic approaches. Breakthrough innovation prospects are increasing, and that's exactly what we need. "

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Scott Mackin, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UCSF, and Rachel L. Nosheny, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at UCSF, are also principal investigators.

BHR works in partnership with the Alzheimer's Association, the Alzheimer Drug Discovery Foundation, the California Department of Public Health, General Electric, the Global Alzheimer's Foundation Platform Foundation and much more.

For more information on joining the OHR, click on right here.

The ADNI study is looking for emergency participants, Weiner said. This research study uses advanced imaging to monitor the brain levels of two proteins, tau protein and amyloid protein, two significant factors of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also follow cognitive functions through home computer tests, as well as occasional exams and tests in the doctor's office. No medicine is involved. Participants must:

  • To be between 55 and 90 years old;
  • You have memory problems with or without diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

For more information on participating in the ADNI study, click on right here.

Weiner has written 821 peer-reviewed research articles and 62 book chapters. He holds 19 distinct research awards and has received numerous awards, including the Middleton Award for Outstanding Research in the Veterans Administration and the Nancy and Ronald Reagan Award for research by the Alzheimer's Association. .

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Nevertheless, even he hesitates to predict when a treatment and / or treatment will be found for Alzheimer's disease: "We can not even predict the next elections. How are we going to predict a cure for Alzheimer's disease? Predicting things is very dangerous. Promising therapeutic trials are underway, so a discovery may come soon, but we do not know. People want to have hope, but it's not like building a skyscraper. Progress is being made, but it is slow. If you want to do something to help the field, sign up for the Brain Health Registry or volunteer for a study. "

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"If you want to do something to hasten the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, join the registry of brain health," said Michael W. Weiner, M.D.

Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), Weiner is the principal investigator of the Brain Health Registry (BHR) and the Alzheimer's funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (DIDI): a 14-year longitudinal study involving more than 1,500 subjects at 60 sites in the United States and Canada and one of the largest observational studies in the world using MRI, PET and biomarkers to study Alzheimer's disease.

PUBLICITY

Dr. Michael Weiner, Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) and Principal Investigator of the Brain Health Registry (BHR).

Photo provided by the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

Weiner launched BHR five years ago as a low-cost scalable approach in response to the "very expensive and high-tech approach" of ADNI for the study of the disease. d & # 39; Alzheimer's. The BHR brain questionnaires and tests are used as tools to help researchers identify normal elderly people at risk of cognitive decline and dementia, and provide data to facilitate the work of other researchers.

"I have been doing research for 50 years. I have been doing research on Alzheimer's for 25 years, "he said. "The overall goal of our field is to identify people at risk of developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia and to help develop treatments to prevent them. But research is slowing down because we do not recruit enough volunteers to carry them out. We want everyone. We want African-Americans, Spaniards and Asians. We want blue-collar workers, white-collar workers, workers, high school graduates, college graduates and graduates of higher education. We want our registry to look like America.

More than 62,000 participants have already registered for the OHR and scientists hope to increase this number to 100,000 or more this year. Through a series of quizzes and brain tests spanning approximately 30 minutes twice a year, the OHR can observe and study changes in brain health over time, and then use this information to accelerate brain health research. . Anyone over the age of 18 can join HRE, including healthy people, people with health problems or memory, people with brain disease and people with and without a history of illness brain in their family.

Since October 2014, when the BHR began inviting participants twice a year to complete follow-up questionnaires and brainstorming, more than half of the registered participants returned at least once, helping researchers to observe the results. trends in brain health that evolve slowly over the years.

A web-based observational study and the first large-scale project in the field of neuroscience that leverages online capabilities in this way, the BHR was designed to capture large amounts of data enabling researchers to Identify, evaluate and monitor cognitive processes more effectively. changes associated with the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cerebral aging.

PUBLICITY

In addition to long-term data collection, BHR has directed more than 23,000 interested participants to further research studies on brain health, aging and dementia, including clinical trials.

"We want everyone to join the brain health registry for a variety of reasons," said Weiner. "I focus mainly on the elderly and people over 60, but we collaborate a lot. We will provide our data to any investigator who wishes. And people are interested in all kinds of things. "

Weiner said that other researchers and institutions can and have used the data for their own research in areas such as sleep disorders and cognition, autism, and the aging process in general. "We are also interested in seeing what the natural aging process looks like, and the only way to do that is to compare young people to older people," Weiner said. "With the register of brain health, we can do it."

UCSF researchers are sensitive to confidentiality issues and the identities of participants are never disclosed without the consent of the individual, Weiner said. And since the BHR is supervised by UCSF, all its study activities are approved and regulated by the UCSF Institutional Review Committee (IRB), or Ethics Committee.

PUBLICITY

HRE participants complete online questionnaires and tests that, over time, provide researchers with information and therefore the ability to track changes in the health, lifestyle, and cognitive function of an individual. individual. These changes could be important indicators of a person's brain health and could help identify and best recruit ideal candidates for medical research and future clinical trials.

Tens of millions of Americans suffer from brain diseases and the number of participants in BHR is increasing every day. "The more people who will accept filling out questionnaires and brain tests, the more information collected will be valuable and the greater the impact researchers will have in accelerating the discovery of treatments for brain diseases. such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, etc. "Weiner said.

He added that he hoped that by creating a large database (at least 100,000) of pre-qualified potential participants, researchers "could conduct clinical trials of neurological diagnostics and treatments more quickly," he said. better and more innovative ".

"We are a large pool of potential participants in clinical trials. Brain tests and questionnaires can help identify those who might benefit from diagnostic tools or potential therapies, "he said. "This group of shortlisted candidates can take years of testing. When trials are faster, better and cheaper, researchers can test more theories and try new therapeutic approaches. Breakthrough innovation prospects are increasing, and that's exactly what we need. "

PUBLICITY

Scott Mackin, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UCSF, and Rachel L. Nosheny, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at UCSF, are also principal investigators.

BHR works in partnership with the Alzheimer's Association, the Alzheimer Drug Discovery Foundation, the California Department of Public Health, General Electric, the World Alzheimer's Platform Foundation and many others.

For more information on joining BHR, click here.

The ADNI study is looking for emergency participants, Weiner said. This research study uses advanced imaging to monitor the brain levels of two proteins – tau and amyloid – that have been shown to be significant indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also follow cognitive functions through home computer tests, as well as occasional exams and tests in the doctor's office. No medicine is involved. Participants must:

  • To be between 55 and 90 years old;
  • You have memory problems with or without diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

For more information on participating in the ADNI study, click here.

Weiner has written 821 peer-reviewed research articles and 62 book chapters. He holds 19 distinct research awards and has received numerous awards, including the Middleton Award for Outstanding Research in the Veterans Administration and the Nancy and Ronald Reagan Award for research by the Alzheimer's Association. .

PUBLICITY

Nevertheless, even he hesitates to predict when a treatment and / or treatment will be found for Alzheimer's disease: "We can not even predict the next elections. How are we going to predict a cure for Alzheimer's disease? Predicting things is very dangerous. Promising therapeutic trials are underway, so a discovery may come soon, but we do not know. People want to have hope, but it's not like building a skyscraper. Progress is being made, but it is slow. If you want to do something to help the field, sign up for the Brain Health Registry or volunteer for a study. "


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