Gillibrand, the first democrat of 2020 to unveil her 2018 tax returns: find out what she's done



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Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, of New York, unveiled her income tax returns for 2018 on Wednesday and urged her rivals to apply for the Democratic presidency to follow her.

"Join me in asking each presidential candidate to disclose his taxes. This is where transparency and accountability lie, "said Gillibrand in a video, during which she challenged the rest of Democracy 2020 candidates to make their statements public.

FIVE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND

Gillibrand – the first presidential candidate of 2020 to unveil her 2018 statements – announced an adjusted gross income of just over $ 214,000, of which nearly $ 168,000 came from her salary in the Senate and the most of the balance of his sales contract.

The Senator paid $ 29,710 in federal taxes, an effective rate of 13.6%.

His campaign touted the fact that Gillibrand is now publishing its 12 years of tax returns – available online – since its first year in Congress in 2007.

"Since my first day in the House, I have prioritized transparency and accountability," Gillibrand said.

"For public servants, the publication of your tax returns shows the Americans that you are only working for them, not for the powerful," she added in an apparent blow to Republican President Donald Trump.

GILLIBRAND AT 2 PERCENT OF LATEST FOX NEWS 2020 RECALL

Democrats have repeatedly criticized Trump for refusing to publish his tax returns. During the 2016 campaign, he became the first major presidential candidate over the decades not to release his taxes. Trump asserted that he was subject to an audit by the Internal Revenue Service.

The president's persistent refusal to disclose his statements fueled criticism that he was hiding assets to avoid accusations of conflict of interest.

Tax returns paint a more comprehensive picture of a presidential candidate's financial situation, ranging from income and revenue to the effective tax rate that they pay for charitable donations and assets. abroad.

The presidential candidate, Senator Elizabeth Warren, pointed out that she had published her last ten years of tax returns and had, like Gillibrand, urged other candidates to do the same.

But the Massachusetts Democrat has not yet released his 2018 statements.

The Warren campaign told Fox News that the candidate had not yet filed her 2018 returns, "but we will publish them too."

The filing period for tax returns ends only on April 15th.

Senator Bernie Sanders, another White House candidate, has promised to release 10 years of his tax returns, but has not yet acted.

The independent Vermont senator recently called the blockage "mechanical problem" and promised to make the results public "soon".

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