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Here are the dark mode browsers – and the websites



Browsers are starting to support darker modes of websites, so what you see in the browser is the rest of your PC or phone.

Browsers are starting to support darker modes of websites, so what you see in the browser is the rest of your PC or phone.

Stephen Shankland / CNET

If you like your text to be white on a black background, good news: Browser support for dark websites is a success. Apple has integrated black-mode support into its Safari for MacOS browser and Mozilla has followed suit with Firefox. But now, the capabilities of darker websites are coming to Google Chrome, Microsoft's recently revamped Edge and Apple's Safari on iPhone and iPad.

Dark moods are a hot topic these days. Some people just like their physical appearance, but it's not just aesthetic, as people who work at night can attest. Browser support means that the web will not be left behind by dark motion.

It is complicated to add black mode support to all the computer bases of our lives, even when operating systems such as MacOS and Windows already offer a high-level dark mode option. If you do not believe me, take a look at the details regarding icon redrawing and button recolouring in the carefully thought out tips of Apple's Black Mode.

Web sites, which can host full-fledged applications nowadays, add an extra layer of dark-mode complexity. Websites of glaring whiteness are a blatant infraction if your operating system has darkened your taskbar or dock and if your browser's interface has title bars and d & # 39; Black tabs.

Web developers, however, can now add a "prefers color scheme" control to their code to solve the problem. This will let the compatible browsers extract specific instructions, such as making the text white, making the backgrounds at the appropriate degree of darkness, selecting the colors of the elements such as a linked text.

The support of this option in dark mode is generalized:

Browser support is only part of the equation. Web designers will need to support dark modes for them to be widely used. It will be a job, but considering the number of people who want the dark mode, you can expect it to spill out.






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