Hurricane season: NOAA wants a tropical disturbance, no threat for FL



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What you need to prepare for a hurricane

The Harrison County EMA Director, Rupert Lacy, reviews a list of items you need to prepare for a hurricane, including some items you may not have known about. to be not thought.

The Harrison County EMA Director, Rupert Lacy, reviews a list of items you need to prepare for a hurricane, including some items you may not have known about. to be not thought.

The Saturday afternoon National Hurricane Center weather forecast focuses on a low pressure zone that, according to meteorologists, could develop several hundred kilometers to the south or southwest of Bermuda at the beginning of the work week. .

There is no chance that a tropical storm will form over the next two days, although continued development into a tropical or subtropical cyclone is possible – a 40% chance over five days, up from 10% from Saturday's forecast at 1am – north or north-east.

But the chances that this system affects Florida are as far away as the return of Ultra to downtown Miami. It will not happen.

In fact, this low pressure attention sensor should not disturb the east coast, period.

So, who cares? Do you even have to stay for the next hurricane center report at 2 am … Sunday?

Yes, you should use these winter disturbances before the season as a way to give nature a helping hand. They say, "get ready."

If it becomes the storm named Andrea somewhere in the Atlantic – or even an unnamed weather system – it would be a bit premature as the hurricane season should not begin until June 1st.

But as fans of the Sunfest Music Festival and visitors to the Fort Lauderdale Air and Sea Show know, on April 30, a disturbance across the southeast Bahamas drew the attention of the National Hurricane Center – and the ours – because it has sent bad wet weather to much of Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties.

These popular events continued, but people were soaked.

For this weekend in South Florida, enjoy sunny days with temperatures ranging from the mid-80s and low temperatures in the most nocturnal 70s. However, the National Weather Service in Miami has dangerous weather forecasts due to the high risk of back currents on Palm Beach beaches and moderate risk at Broward and Miami-Dade. There is also a possibility of isolated and potentially strong thunderstorms.

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Howard Cohen, a reporter with Real Time at Miami Herald / News Breaking News, winner of the 2017 Media Excellence Awards, covered pop music, theater, health and fitness, obituaries, city governments, and works in general. He began his career at the Miami Herald's reporting department in 1991.


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