Lime finally gives its data to Auckland City Council



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Auckland's board says Lime finally provided the requested data on Friday.

The information will now be evaluated – a process that the board believes will take at least 24 hours.

"Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have received information from Lime, and our teams are currently reviewing this issue," said Dean Kimpton, Chief Operating Officer.

"Lime's independent reviewer, Exponent, has indicated that its review is ongoing and that it will provide additional information to that already provided, by Wednesday at the end of the day." The suspension of the license will be maintained until the end of the day. that we have obtained this information and completed our examination. "

Read more: Guess who lubricates the wheels for lime

The councils in Auckland and Dunedin ordered the electronic scooters to leave their streets on Friday after Lime provided information on a wheel lock malfunction that resulted in 155 incidents and 30 injuries.

About 2,000 electronic scooters are now stored in the Lime's Kingsland warehouse – 1,000 licenses under its test license and another 1,000 stored in reserve in case the scope of its test would be extended before its expires on March 31st.

Lime announced Friday that it had launched a firmware upgrade that corrected the wheel lock issue and that there had been no incidents since. He also indicates that the 155 incidents represent a tiny fraction of the 1.8 million lime trips in New Zealand so far.

The mechanic Luis Prada at the Lime Warehouse located at New North Rd, Kingsland, where about 2000 banned limes from Auckland streets are stored. Photo / Jason Oxenham
The mechanic Luis Prada at the Lime Warehouse located at New North Rd, Kingsland, where about 2000 banned limes from Auckland streets are stored. Photo / Jason Oxenham

Lime confirmed that he still had a former Auckland Transportation Director and a former Labor Party chairman. Williams helped Uber-sponsored startup brokerage meetings with key AT staff, as well as Transport Minister Phil Twyford.

Scholars Bryce Edwards said it was undemocratic for an influential actor like Williams to open the doors on behalf of his clients, and noted that many countries require lobbying to be leaked.

Read more: In the United States, lime drivers were injured by an "excessive sudden braking".

Twyford replied that everyone was invited to make an appointment with him.

It is possible that Auckland, Dunedin and other councils give Lime a permanent license, but with conditions. Those such as mandatory helmets or moving electronic scooters on bike lanes (where they are currently not allowed) would require a national change in law, initiated by the Minister of Transport.

The mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's warehouse in Kingsland. Photo / Jason Oxenham.
The mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's warehouse in Kingsland. Photo / Jason Oxenham.

Twyford told the Herald"E-scooters offer real benefits in that they offer a quick and cost-effective way to cover short distances and connect to public transport.We always balance the need for mobility with the safety of people and scooters do not are not different. "

The mechanic Vlatko Jovanovski at Lime's warehouse in Kingsland. Photo / Jason Oxenham.
The mechanic Vlatko Jovanovski at Lime's warehouse in Kingsland. Photo / Jason Oxenham.

Twyford added, "Part of the solution will be to create more space in our street for pedestrians, cyclists and underpowered vehicles, such as electric scooters.The government is already planning to invest 390 millions of dollars over the next three years to develop its trails, shared trails and bike paths.

"The government is also looking into whether we have the right level of regulation for low-power vehicles, including consideration of potential speed limits and vehicles that should be allowed on the sidewalk."

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