NASA wants to pay £ 14,000 to stay in BED for two months



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NASA wants to pay £ 14,000 for people to stay at BED for two months while watching movies and reading books to study the effects of microgravity

  • The 60-day study will consist of doing everything while lying in a special bed
  • Twenty-four participants will be selected and half will be centrifuged in a centrifuge
  • To see if "artificial gravity chambers" are viable for long-term space travel

Volunteers receive £ 14,000 to stay in bed for two months and watch TV to help NASA understand the consequences of space travel on astronauts.

The dream job for many is designed to see how "artificial gravity" affects the human body and participants will have to do everything flat, including going to the bathroom.

Space experts from NASA and ESA will study them 24 hours a day to understand how astronauts can be affected by prolonged periods of space, the main concern being muscle wasting.

ESA says it is essential to understand the damage that can be caused by weightlessness, cosmic radiation, isolation and spatial restrictions.

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They will be stalled slightly sloping, feet above the head and body to reduce the accumulation of blood in the ends of the body (photo). This should mimic the effects of the presence in space and can lead to numbness and muscle loss

They will be stalled slightly sloping, feet above the head and body to reduce the accumulation of blood in the ends of the body (photo). This should mimic the effects of the presence in space and can lead to numbness and muscle loss

Two dozen volunteers will be subject to 60 days of rest in the permanent bed in Cologne and all participants will have to speak German.

The only requirements are that participants are between the ages of 24 and 55 and are in good health.

They will be wedged slightly sloping, feet above the head and body to reduce the accumulation of blood in the ends of the body.

This should mimic the effects of the presence in the space and can lead to numbness and loss of muscle mass.

The two space agency project will offer participants plenty of entertainment and reading activities in exchange for their time.

He also recommends participants use the time and opportunity to sign up for some online courses.

"The use of artificial gravity could be the best solution for the protection of human health during long-term, long-duration space missions," Dr. Edwin Mulder, principal investigator at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine, told The Sun. .

Half of the participants will follow treatments similar to those of an "artificial gravity" chamber. They will be rotated in a centrifuge (see photo) at 30 rpm in hopes that the blood will fall to their extremities.

Half of the participants will follow treatments similar to those of an "artificial gravity" chamber. They will be rotated in a centrifuge (see photo) at 30 rpm in hopes that the blood will fall to their extremities.

Half of the participants will follow treatments similar to those of an "artificial gravity" chamber.

They will be centrifuged in a centrifuge at 30 rpm in the hope that it will push the blood back to their extremities.

It is hoped that comparing and contrasting the physical deterioration of the two groups – spun and unsprayed – will provide data to mitigate this phenomenon during long-term space travel.

A three-month block of time will need to be released to participate in the study as a two-week re-education period will follow the test and the 60-day work period will be preceded by a five-day orientation period.

WHY DO YOU GET TO TALL IN SPACE?

Astronauts can gain up to three inches (7 cm) more in space because of the effects of microgravity on the human body.

Imagine that the vertebrae in your back form a giant spring.

By pressing the spring, it stays well wound.

When the force is released, the spring stretches.

In the same way, the spine lengthens up to three percent while humans are traveling in space.

There is less gravity that pushes on the vertebrae, so that they can stretch.

The stretching of the spine also occurs every night to the extent that when you lie down, gravity does not weigh on your vertebrae.

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