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O.J. Simpson leads police in infamous Bronco hunt



It's been 25 years since 95 million people were glued to their television to watch football legend O.J. Simpson while he was trying to escape the police. The infamous Ford Bronco police hunt took place a few days after Simpson's ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, was killed along with her friend Ron Goldman. The Los Angeles Police Department asked Simpson to report the murders, but instead of complying with them, Simpson and his friend, A.C. Cowlings, drove off into a white Bronco. While the police were looking for Simpson, his long-time friend, Robert Kardashian, read a note on live television that had been prepared by the football player. Some perceived the letter as a suicide note, which accelerated the search. At the end of the day, it was mobile phone data that helped the police to find the runaway. The cars quickly became a public spectacle with fans strewing the street when the Bronco passed carrying placards reading "Juice," Simpson's nickname. Fans cheered as the police followed the Bronco for 75 miles across Southern California. The hunt was broadcast live around the world. More and more people were watching Bronco run after this year's Super Bowl. Finally, Bronco stopped at Simpson's mother's house and entered. Simpson's lawyer arrived shortly thereafter and he went to the police. The football star pleaded not guilty to both murders and was acquitted by a jury in a 134-day trial. He was later found "responsible" by a jury in a civil suit brought by Ron Goldman's parents.

It's been 25 years since 95 million people were glued to their television to watch football legend O.J. Simpson while he was trying to escape the police.

The infamous Ford Bronco police hunt took place a few days after Simpson's ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, was killed along with her friend Ron Goldman.

The Los Angeles Police Department asked Simpson to report the murders, but instead of complying with them, Simpson and his friend, A.C. Cowlings, drove off into a white Bronco.

While the police were looking for Simpson, his long-time friend, Robert Kardashian, read a note on live television that had been prepared by the football player.

Some perceived the letter as a suicide note, which accelerated the search.

In the end, it was the mobile phone data that helped law enforcement find the pair on the run.

The cars quickly became a public spectacle with fans strewing the street at the Bronco crossing carrying signs saying "Jus", Simpson's nickname.

Fans cheered as the police followed the Bronco for 75 miles across Southern California.

The hunt was broadcast live around the world.

More people have watched the Bronco pursuit than this year's Super Bowl.

Finally, the Bronco stopped at Simpson's mother's house and he entered.

Simpson's lawyer arrived shortly thereafter and he went to the police.

The football star pleaded not guilty to both murders and was acquitted by a jury in a 134-day trial.

He was later found "responsible" by a jury in a civil suit brought by Ron Goldman's parents.


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