The man discovers that a blocked nose was caused by a tooth that grows in the nostril for two years



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What do you usually put on a blocked nose? Influenza? Allergies? Sinus infection?

Tooth? Absolutely impossible.

Well, it's not so unlikely – or at least it seems, a man from Denmark was relieved of his symptoms, stuffy nose, when the doctors removed a tooth from his nose.

The 59-year-old complained of nasal congestion, loss of smell and loss of sense of smell for two years.

According to BMJ Case Reports, the young man had suffered facial trauma at a young age, which had fractured his jaw and nose – potentially explaining the illness he was suffering from.

But according to Sky News, the doctors said there was no evidence to suggest that the repositioning after the incident was related to the nasal growth condition.

This is a picture taken by an endoscope of the tooth before it is removed. Credit: BMJ Case Reports
This is a picture taken by an endoscope of the tooth before it is removed. Credit: BMJ Case Reports

Dr. Milos Fuglsang wrote in BMJ case reports: "Our patient most likely had an intranasally preserved tooth for most of his life, but his symptoms had started late."

After a CT scan, the doctors were able to use an endoscope to perform a surgical extraction in a facility for the ears, nose and throat of the Aarhus University Hospital.

Initially, the doctors suspected that it was a cyst or a tumor and thought that was what they were going to remove.

The tooth next to a pen for size. Credit: BMJ Case Reports
The tooth next to a pen for size. Credit: BMJ Case Reports

The report concluded: "Intranasal teeth are a rare finding but that it is important to recognize because nasal congestion, chronic wasting and hyposmia can adversely affect the quality of life."

The patient was fine after one month after saline nasal irrigation and ten days of antibiotics, no new symptoms were reported.

According to MailOnline, the growth of a tooth this way is rare and would probably affect between 0.1% and 1% of the population.

The tooth after extraction. Credit: BMJ Case Reports
The tooth after extraction. Credit: BMJ Case Reports

And about the objects removed from the nose – a little girl had to undergo surgery to remove a safety pin from her nose after it got stuck in an open position.

Moumita Let was taken to the hospital with excruciating pain and the doctors had to remove the pin by the mouth under general anesthesia. Pleasant.

An X-ray showing the safety pin stuck inside Moumita Nez. Credit: SWNS
An X-ray showing the safety pin stuck inside Moumita Nez. Credit: SWNS

Dr. Suvendu Bhattacharya performed the procedure at a public hospital in Suri, West Bengal, India, after arriving at her parents' home.

With the help of an endoscope and his fingers, Dr. Bhattacharya was finally able to locate and remove the pin.

He explained: "I saw that the pin was stuck behind the midrib of the nose.It was impossible to remove it from the front as the pin was open from the inside and would have caused it to Other injuries We had already put a nasal tube to allow him to breathe.

"Then I inserted the endoscope into the nostril and I finally found the pin removed by pushing it into the mouth."

Well, it kept us from sticking anything in the nose – if we went there someday. As for the teeth, we will just have to hope and pray.

Image credit: BMJ case reports

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