The ocean sinks into the Earth's mantle and a dead supercontinent is partly responsible



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<p class = "canvas-atom web-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The ocean is a large bathtub filled with 326 million cubic miles (1.3 billion cubic kilometers) of water, and someone unplugged the drain. "Data-reactid =" 22 "> The ocean is a large bathtub filled with water of 326 million cubic miles (1.3 billion cubic kilometers), and someone unplugged the drain .

<p class = "web-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Every day, hundreds of millions of gallons of water as part of a very wet recycling program that scientists call the deep water cycle.It works as follows: first, the water absorbed into the crust and the minerals at the bottom the sea are both jostled inside the Earth at the submarine limits where the tectonic plates collide, and some of this water remains trapped (some studies estimates that two to four oceans of water flow through the mantle), but much of this water is released to the surface by the submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents.[[[[50 interesting facts about planet earth]"data-reactid =" 23 "> Every day, hundreds of millions of liters of water run from the bottom of the ocean into the Earth's mantle as part of a Very wet recycling program that scientists call the deep water cycle.It works as follows: First, the water absorbed in the crust and minerals at the bottom of the sea are both introduced to the water. 39, inside the Earth, at the submarine boundaries where the tectonic plates collide.Some of these waters remain trapped (some studies estimate that the value of water is from two to four oceans trailing through the mantle) but large amounts of water are released to the surface by submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents. [50 Interesting Facts About Planet Earth]

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "This is not a perfect system; scientists believe that there is currently much more water diving into the mantle than spitting on it – but that's okay, overall this cycle is just a cog in the machine that determines whether the the oceans of the world go up or down. "data-reactid =" 24 "> This is not a perfect system, scientists believe that there is currently much more water that dives into the coat than throwing up – but this This cycle is basically a gear in the machine that determines whether the world's oceans go up or down.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Now, in a study published May 17 in the newspaper Geochemistry, geophysics and geosystemsresearchers report that this cog could be more important than expected. By modeling the flows in the deep water cycle over the past 230 million years, the authors of the study discovered that the Earth had sometimes experienced a tremendous amount of water that sank into the mantle and played a disproportionate role in the sea level; during these periods, the only deep-sea cycle may have contributed to a sea level loss of 130 meters, thanks to an event that shook the world: the dissolution of the supercontinent Pangea. "Data-reactid =" 25 "> Now, in a study published May 17 in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics and Geosystems, researchers say that this cog could be more unpredictable than expected.Modeling the flows in the cycle of the In the past 230 million years, the authors of the study have discovered that in the history of the Earth, the considerable amount of water that gigantic In this period, the deep water cycle alone could contribute to the (130 meters) loss of sea level, due to an event that changed the world: the dissolution of the supercontinent Pangea.

"The bursting of Pangea has been associated with a very rapid subduction period of the tectonic plate," said Live Science reporter Krister Karlsen, senior author of the study, a researcher at the Center for Cancer Therapy. Evolution and Earth's dynamics of the University of Oslo. "This has led to a period of significant water transport in the Earth, resulting in a drop in the associated sea level."

Death of a supercontinent

About 200 million years ago, the supercontinent Pangea (a landmass composed of the seven continents that we know today) began to split into two parts, sending huge slabs of earth in all directions.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "As these continental plates separated, new oceans appeared (starting with l & # 39; Atlantic, about 175 million years ago), huge cracks in the seabed have cracked and old underwater crust slabs have plunged into the voids. Gargantuan quantities of water trapped inside these pieces of crust have moved from the surface of the planet to its deep interior. "Data-reactid =" 29 "> As these continental plates separated, new oceans appeared (beginning with the Atlantic, about millions of years ago), huge cracks in the seabed have cracked and old underwater crust plates have plunged into empty voids.Gungarant water amounts trapped inside these pieces of crust have moved from the surface of the planet towards its deep interior.

<p class = "canvas-atom-canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Based on previous studies of Earth's tectonic plates Over the past 230 million years, researchers have modeled approximate rates of water entry and exit into the Earth 's mantle. The faster a plate rich in water fell on the Earth, the more it could subside before its moisture content evaporated under the effect of the intense heat of the mantle. According to the calculations of the team, this has sufficiently unbalanced the deep water cycle to result in extreme water losses for millions of years. "Data-reactid =" 30 "> Building on previous studies of Earth's tectonic plates over the last 230 million years, researchers have modeled approximate rates of input and output. The more water a plate drenched in water quickly fell into the Earth, the more it could subside before its water content evaporated under the effect of the Intense heat from the mantle, this has sufficiently unbalanced the deep water cycle to cause extreme water losses for millions of years.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Of course, the sea level is not limited to Karlsen said that it was only the movement of very deep waters and that this study does not take into account the other processes of sea level change. like climate change or ice cover. Even if massive amounts of water enter the mantle, the current level of the sea can reach tens of meters high and scales much shorter. "Data-reactid =" 31 "> Of course, the sea level is not limited to its only movement Karlsen said that this study does not take into account other processes of sea level change, such as Whether climate change or ice cap coverage, even if large amounts of water seep into the mantle, the current sea level can reach several hundred feet at much shorter times.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "At this moment, the ocean is in full middle of another sea ​​level rush, largely thanks to climate change of human origin (Estimates vary, but sea level is likely to increase from 6 to 16 feet in the next century). Unfortunately, all these billions of gallons of seawater flowing in the mantle can not save us from this dangerous trend. "Data-reactid =" 32 "> At the present time, the ocean is at the center of another sea level spike, largely due to climate change brought on by the sea. Man (estimates vary, but sea level will likely increase from 6 to 16 feet over the next century.) Unfortunately, all those billions of gallons of seawater flowing in the mantle can not save us of life, this dangerous trend.

"While the deep-sea cycle can actually change the sea level over hundreds of millions, even billions of years, climate change can alter the sea level in zero to 100 years," he said. Karlsen. "By comparison, the current sea level rise associated with climate change is about 3.2 millimeters (0.1 inches) per year." The sea level decline associated with the cycle deep water is about 1/10 000 of it. "

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Originally published on Science live."data-reactid =" 38 ">Originally published on Science live.

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