The optical illusion that "breaks" your brain for 15 milliseconds



The optical illusion that "breaks" your brain for 15 milliseconds: a circular pattern delays communication between the regions of your brain that process vision and movement

  • The famous Pinna-Brelstaff optical illusion features rings and dotted lines that show a rotating effect
  • The illusion is a communication delay in areas of your brain that process vision, according to scientists
  • The dashes rotate clockwise if you move your head towards them or counter-clockwise if you remove your head
  • Experts from the Chinese Academy of Sciences say it's like you're listening to a voice amid a lot of noise
  • The physical movement is like the background noise and the illusion is the voice in the noise that you have to choose

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An incredible optical illusion that "breaks your brain" for 15 milliseconds and lets you see a circular shaped rotation was created by scientists.

The geometric pattern, a variant of Pinna-Brelstaff's diamond-shaped illusion, rotates clockwise or counter-clockwise, depending on the direction of the moving of the head.

The small thick dashes appear to rotate clockwise if you move the head toward the image, or counterclockwise if you remove the head from the # 39; image.

This is due to a delay in communication between the regions of your brain that process vision and movement.

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Scientists have understood why an optical illusion "breaks your brain" for 15 milliseconds, which makes you see a circular shape turn clockwise and counterclockwise. A watch, depending on the direction in which you move your head. The small thick strokes appear to rotate clockwise if you move the head towards them or counter-clockwise if you move them apart.

Scientists have understood why an optical illusion "breaks your brain" for 15 milliseconds, which makes you see a circular shape turn clockwise and counterclockwise. A watch, depending on the direction in which you move your head. The small thick strokes appear to rotate clockwise if you move the head towards them or counter-clockwise if you move them apart.

A team of scientists has tested how parts of the brain that help us understand motion perception combine real and illusory visual information to create the impression that the image is moving.

This allowed them to find cells that seem to treat the illusion in the same way as a moving object. And the monkeys also seem to experience illusion this way.

"It's a bit like if you were attending a party where you were listening to a voice among a lot of noise," said Ian Max Andolina, author of the study, at New Scientist.

& # 39; The physical movement is like a background noise and the illusion is the voice in the sound you must hear. It takes a little longer to do that.

WHAT IS PINNA-BRELSTAFF OPTICAL ILLUSION?

Pinna's illusion is the first visual illusion showing a rotating motion effect.

The Pinna-Brelstaff illusion is a series of orange and brown dotted lines arranged in concentric circles, whose design makes them appear in rotation.

When the observer's head is slowly moved towards the figure with the gaze fixed in the center, the inner ring of the squares appears to turn counterclockwise and the outer ring clockwise .

The direction of rotation is reversed when the observer moves away from the figure, the same squares of the inner ring seem to rotate clockwise, while those of the outer ring rotate in the opposite direction of the needles of a clock.

The apparent movement is perceived instantly and in a direction perpendicular to the real movement.

To make these discoveries, the researchers formed two macaques, monkeys with visual processing systems similar to those of humans, to see exactly how their brain was dealing with the optical illusion.

The researchers were able to see how parts of this process occur by placing electrodes in the monkey's brain.

The results revealed that there was a delay of 15 milliseconds between the neurons, or brain cells, which perceived that the lines were moving – in this case, the illusion that the set of lines were moving – and those who did not perceive any movement.

Paul Azzopardi, a psychologist at Oxford University, told New Scientist: "As you move your head, the way these elements slide on your retina will have two directions of movement: an external expansion, but also induced rotation. in that the edge is inclined.

"It's different from something that just rotates or expands, so you can expect it to take a little more work to solve what the motion is telling you."

The complete results of the study were published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

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