Home / Others / The recent death of dolphins in SWFL raises concerns

The recent death of dolphins in SWFL raises concerns



NECKLACE COUNTY

You go to the beach to see the waves, the beautiful coastline and the dolphins – not the dead sea life washed away on a golf cart. But that's what happened after a dolphin landed on Monday at Barefoot Beach, and it's not the first

In Florida, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials have kidnapped at least five dead dolphins from beaches in southwestern Florida in recent days.

"It's always a turtle, a dolphin or even a small bait fish," said Colleen Gill. "It breaks my heart every time."

It does not matter what type of marine life goes ashore, it's not what everyone wants along the beach.

The continued loss of marine life has hit Gill hard when she fell on the dead dolphin on Naples Beach this morning.

"The normal red tide should not do that to dolphins," Gill said. "This should not have an impact on a large part of the population, especially big creatures like these."

Fishing guide captain Tony Fontana of Naples, a saltwater fisherman, fears that the persistent red tide is also responsible for several recent deaths of dolphins in Collier County.

"It's sad for me," Fontana said. "It's as sad as any other marine life dying. I mean, it strikes us humans because they are mammals. "

Off Vanderbilt Beach, the presence of the red tide is also noticeable. There are dead fish and birds lining the beach.

"This is disturbing because we have chosen the right place to buy a second home in which we plan to retire. Brian Pulis said. "It will be interesting to see the figures next year."

NOAA research has associated nearly 80 bottleneck dolphins this year. Fontana thinks this tragic figure is a sign.

"The quality of our water is getting worse and worse," Fontana said.

Scientists will have to test these dolphins to see if the red tide has killed them.

NOAA said it was crucial to report a dead dolphin sighting.

"If that's what he's eating, then we know the fish is still sick," said Gill. "And it's still a problem in the water, so it's a bigger problem than everybody else has understood."


Source link