The time spent in front of a screen has more than doubled in babies, mainly thanks to television – Axios



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Screen time for children aged 0 to 2 years more than doubled between 1997 and 2014, according to a new report published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Pediatrics.

The bottom line: The study found that the bulk of the slight rise came from the time spent on the screen on television. In total, television consumption more than doubled in percentage points of total screen time consumption from 1997 to 2014.

Why it's important: This means that the increase in screen time may not be the result of an attack on new technologies, but rather changes in parental interactions due to work schedules or other socio-economic factors.

  • To this end, the study notes that the 2014 high screen user group was dominated by boys and children with a low level of parenting education and a low family income.
  • The authors recommend that future research examine the link between time spent in front of a screen and other "supplement measures to child development", such as parenting style, the influence of the brothers and sisters and peers.

In numbers: In 1997, the average daily projection time was 1.32 hours for children aged 0 to 2 years and 2.47 hours for children aged 3 to 5 years. In 2014, the total screening time for children aged 0-2 years was 3.05 hours per day. Compared to other devices, the screen time allocated to the television is the highest.

  • In 1997, the study found that on average, children aged 0 to 2 and 3 to 5 years old watched television for about 43% and 48% of their time spent in school. screen, respectively.
  • In 2014, the study found that on average, children aged 0 to 2 and 3 to 5 years old watched television for about 86% and 78% of their time spent in school. screen, respectively.

Yes, but: Dylan Collins, CEO of the SuperAwesome Children's Technology Company, explained by e-mail that this study had stopped measuring listening habits after a decisive shift in the media regime of young children.

  • "The real acceleration of the decline of children's TV started in 2013/2014, so I think what you're seeing here is the peak of children's TV, at which point you also saw children consuming multi-screen + TV in the background). "

The big picture: Although there has not been so far much long-term study on the impact of screen time on children's health, some research suggests Long-term screening can increase the risk of childhood obesity and may be associated with poorer performance in developmental screening. tests later in childhood.

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