"There is nothing wrong with taking information from the Russians."



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Rudolph Giuliani observes the scene before President Donald Trump announces the nomination of his Supreme Court candidate in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Rudolph Giuliani observes the scene before President Donald Trump announces the nomination of his Supreme Court candidate in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC.

SAUL LOEB / Getty Images

President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Rudolph Giuliani, argued on Sunday that there was nothing wrong with a political campaign using information from a foreign opponent to win elections. Mind you, he would have personally advised against it, but that does not mean it's wrong. Giuliani said this when answering a question from CNN's Jake Tapper about Senator Mitt Romney's statement in which he said he was "dismayed" that "his fellow citizens working in a campaign for the presidency had welcomed Russian aid. ".

Giuliani quickly fought back and accused Romney of being a hypocrite. "Stop the bull," said Giuliani. "Stop this godly act." The former mayor said Romney "was trying to unearth people, to mess them up," while he was running for president. When Tapper insisted that there was a difference between the search for opposition and the acceptance of information from a foreign opponent, Giuliani suggests that this is the only way to go about it. is all the same. "What a hypocrite. Any candidate around the world – in America – would take information, "said Giuliani. "Who said it was even illegal?" He then insisted that "there is nothing wrong with taking information from the Russians" and that everything depends on "the source."

Despite the insistence on the legality of the movement, Giuliani said that he "would probably not have" taken information from Russian sources. "I have not been asked," he says. "I would have advised, just out of caution, do not do it."

Appearing on the NBC channel Meet the pressGiuliani also refused to give a clear answer as to whether it was acceptable for a political campaign to use equipment stolen by foreign opponents. "It depends on the stolen material," he said. Giuliani also suggested that hacking Democratic emails could have been beneficial for voters. "They should not have stolen it, but the American people have just been informed of the way their campaign was misleading and manipulative," Giuliani said. "I wonder if there is any reason to say that people had the right to know about Hillary Clinton."

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