These are the most hacked passwords in the world – is yours on the list?



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The most violated passwords in the world include first names, musicians and fictional characters. Is yours on the list? Photo credit: Getty

Getty

Last year, when I wrote about the worst passwords of 2018It was horrible to discover items such as "qwerty" and "123456" listed in the top 20 list.

As one would expect, the worst passwords tend to be the most hacked, simply because they are too easy to decipher. It is therefore not surprising that the latest report on incorrect passwords, published this time by the UK National Cyber ​​Security Center (NCSC), presents similar conclusions.

In fact, the password that gave the most results was the same: according to the global NCSC violations analysis, 23.2 million people hacked around the world used the password "123456".

The analysis of the 100,000 most frequently used passwords by hackers during cyber-violations worldwide was taken from Have I been pwned– the site managed by highly regarded security expert Troy Hunt.

The most hacked passwords

Beware: this list can provoke the flood of InfoSec thoughts frustrated by the fact that people in general really need to do better. But the NCSC list is not meant to shame; the organization wants to inform the public of the ease with which a violation is committed, especially when you make no effort with your passwords.

I can not post here all violated passwords, simply because of space constraints, but the most used password includes the ridiculously unimaginative "password" and even the word "1111111", who, frankly, is lazy. Others included names (I suppose people), football teams (please), musicians and fictional characters such as Superman.

So for your entertainment – and, hopefully, for some of you, education, here are the five most used passwords. I've also included a sample of popular violated passwords from the rest of the list:

The 20 most used passwords

123456 (23.2m)

123456789 (7.7m)

qwerty (3.8m)

password (3.6m)

1111111 (3.1m)

12345678 (2.9m)

abc123 (2.8m)

1234567 (2.5 m)

password1 (2.4m)

12345 (2.3 m)

1234567890 (2.2 m)

123123 (2.2 m)

000000 (1.9m)

Iloveyou (1.6m)

1234 (1.3 m)

1q2w3e4r5t (1.2m)

Qwertyuiop (1.1m)

123 (1.02m)

Monkey (980, 209)

Dragon (968,625)

Top 5 names

ashley (432,276)

Michael (425,291)

Daniel (368,227)

Jessica (324,125)

Charlie (308,939)

Top 5 football teams

liverpool (280,723)

Chelsea (216.677)

arsenal (179,095)

manutd (59,440)

everton (46,619)

Top 5 musicians

blink182 (285,706)

50 cent (191,153)

eminem (167 983)

metals (140,841)

noose (140,833)

Top five fictional characters

Superman (333.139)

Naruto (242,749)

Tigger (237,290)

pokemon (226,947)

batman (203,116)

Why is it important

The violations are getting bigger and bigger: Violation of the collection n ° 1,& nbsp; for example, more than a billion unique e-mail addresses and passwords have been posted on a hacking forum accessible to all. Last year, there were major violations on the part of people like Marriott, British Airways and Facebook, among others.

It could be argued that some companies are not doing enough to protect people's data, but users can do something: take control of their own security by trying to follow best practices.

What to do

It goes without saying that if you see your password on the list, you must change it now. You can also start following some simple guidelines. Passwords must be strong, but they must also be unique for each of your different accounts.

Of course, some accounts contain more sensitive information than others, such as your email. However, less than half of the NCSC respondents said they did not always use a strong, separate password for their primary email account. The NCSC itself offers a lot of useful tips on his sitein particular by avoiding the reuse of identifiers and by choosing strong passwords comprising at least three random but memorable words.

If it's hard to remember, I'd recommend a line from a book or song – and do not be afraid to have a physical book for your passwords. As long as you keep it separately from your devices and not in a text file on your desktop, it's actually pretty secure.

Better yet, use a password manager such as LastPass or 1Password. This creates for you passwords that remove the need to memorize them. These must be secured with a master password, which must itself be strong, otherwise hackers could access all your credentials in a convenient place.

Dr. Ian Levy, Technical Director of NCSC, said: "Password managers, whether it's an application built into your browser or device, can help you remember many passwords Just remember to reinforce your master password, in the sense of our advices. "

It's also a good idea to visit the Troy Hunt website, Have euBeenPwned& nbsp; You can enter your e-mail addresses and passwords here to check if they have been found to be non-compliant. Do not hesitate, it's good for people who are worried, but this site is a great tool to help you change your passwords when you need them.

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The most violated passwords in the world include first names, musicians and fictional characters. Is yours on the list? Photo credit: Getty

Getty

Last year, when I wrote about the worst passwords of 2018, it was horrible to discover threats such as "qwerty" and "123456", which figured in the top 20 list.

As one would expect, the worst passwords tend to be the most hacked, simply because they are too easy to decipher. It is therefore not surprising that the latest report on incorrect passwords, published this time by the UK National Cyber ​​Security Center (NCSC), presents similar conclusions.

In fact, the password that gave the most results was the same: according to the global NCSC violations analysis, 23.2 million people hacked around the world used the password "123456".

The analysis of the 100,000 most frequently used passwords by hackers in cyber-violations is recurrent from Have I Been Pwned – the site run by highly esteemed security expert Troy Hunt.

The most hacked passwords

Beware: this list can provoke the flood of InfoSec thoughts frustrated by the fact that people in general really need to do better. But the NCSC list is not meant to shame; the organization wants to inform the public of the ease with which a violation is committed, especially when you make no effort with your passwords.

I can not post here all violated passwords, simply because of space constraints, but the most used password includes the ridiculously unimaginative "password" and even the word "1111111", who, frankly, is lazy. Others included names (I suppose people), football teams (please), musicians and fictional characters such as Superman.

So for your entertainment – and, hopefully, for some of you, education, here are the five most used passwords. I've also included a sample of popular violated passwords from the rest of the list:

The 20 most used passwords

123456 (23.2m)

123456789 (7.7m)

qwerty (3.8m)

password (3.6m)

1111111 (3.1m)

12345678 (2.9m)

abc123 (2.8m)

1234567 (2.5 m)

password1 (2.4m)

12345 (2.3 m)

1234567890 (2.2 m)

123123 (2.2 m)

000000 (1.9m)

Iloveyou (1.6m)

1234 (1.3 m)

1q2w3e4r5t (1.2m)

Qwertyuiop (1.1m)

123 (1.02m)

Monkey (980, 209)

Dragon (968,625)

Top 5 names

ashley (432,276)

Michael (425,291)

Daniel (368,227)

Jessica (324,125)

Charlie (308,939)

Top 5 football teams

liverpool (280,723)

Chelsea (216.677)

arsenal (179,095)

manutd (59,440)

everton (46,619)

Top 5 musicians

blink182 (285,706)

50 cent (191,153)

eminem (167 983)

metals (140,841)

noose (140,833)

Top five fictional characters

Superman (333.139)

Naruto (242,749)

Tigger (237,290)

pokemon (226,947)

batman (203,116)

Why is it important

Violations are getting bigger and bigger: violation # 1, for example, has seen more than a billion email addresses and unique passwords published on a hacking forum accessible to all. Last year, there were major breaches such as Marriott, British Airways and Facebook.

It could be argued that some companies are not doing enough to protect people's data, but users can do something: take control of their own security by trying to follow best practices.

What to do

It goes without saying that if you see your password on the list, you must change it now. You can also start following some simple guidelines. Passwords must be strong, but they must also be unique for each of your different accounts.

Of course, some accounts contain more sensitive information than others, such as your email. However, less than half of the NCSC respondents said they did not always use a strong, separate password for their primary email account. The NCSC itself offers many useful tips on its site, including avoiding the reuse of identifiers and choosing strong passwords that include at least three random but memorable words.

If it's hard to remember, I'd recommend a line from a book or song – and do not be afraid to have a physical book for your passwords. As long as you keep it separately from your devices and not in a text file on your desktop, it's actually pretty secure.

Better yet, use a password manager such as LastPass or 1Password. This creates for you passwords that remove the need to memorize them. These must be secured with a master password, which must itself be strong, otherwise hackers could access all your credentials in a convenient place.

Dr. Ian Levy, Technical Director of NCSC, said: "Password managers, whether it's an application built into your browser or device, can help you remember many passwords Just remember to reinforce your main password, as shown in our guide. "

It's also a good idea to take a look at Troy Hunt's website, HaveIBeenPwned. You can enter your emails and passwords here to check if they have turned out to be offenses. Do not hesitate, it's good for people who are worried, but this site is a great tool to help you change your passwords when you need them.

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