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To have too many sugary drinks related to a higher cancer risk



A new study found that sugary drinks are not harmful to size. They can also increase the risk of cancer.

French researchers found that drinking a small glass of 100% fruit juice or soda – worth about 3.3 ounces – a day was associated with an 18% increase in cancer risk. 22% of breast cancer.

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The study, published Wednesday in the medical journal BMJ, examined more than 100,000 adults aged 42 years on average over a period of nine years. 79% of the participants were women.

Ninety-seven soft drinks and 12 artificially sweetened beverages, including soft drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks and 100% fruit juice with no added sugar, were followed.

Participants completed at least two valid 24-hour online dietary questionnaires that calculated daily consumption of sugary drinks.

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During the follow-up period, researchers measured daily intake of sugary drinks versus dietary drinks and compared them to the cancer cases listed in participants' medical records.

Nearly 2,200 cases of cancer were diagnosed, with the average age of diagnosis being 59 years.

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The study does not conclude that sugar is the cause of cancer, although the authors suggest limiting your daily consumption of sugary drinks is not a bad idea.

"As usual with nutrition, the idea is not to avoid foods, but simply to balance the intake," said Dr. Mathilde Touvier , who led the study, to the Guardian. "Many public health agencies recommend consuming less than one drink a day. If you eat a sweet drink from time to time, it will not be a problem, but if you drink at least one drink a day, it can increase the risk of getting several diseases – here, maybe cancer, but also with a lot of evidence. , cardiometabolic diseases. "

Click here for more information from the New York Post.


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