Trump plans to appoint Jeffrey Rosen as Justice Ministry No. 2



WASHINGTON, Feb. 19 (Reuters) – President Donald Trump is considering appointing Jeffrey Rosen as the next Deputy Attorney General in the United States, the White House announced Tuesday evening during the latest judicial reshuffle in the Department of Justice. investigation.

Rosen, currently deputy secretary of the US Department of Transportation, will succeed Rod Rosenstein, who has appointed a special council to investigate possible links between Russia and President Donald Trump's campaign.

Rosenstein is expected to withdraw by mid-March, a Justice Department official said Monday.

Attorney General William Barr praised Rosen's choice, stating in a statement that he had 35 years of experience at the highest levels of government and in the private sector.

"His years of outstanding experience in the legal and management fields make him an excellent choice to succeed Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who has served the Department of Justice for many years with dedication and distinction." said Barr.

The appointment of Rosen must be confirmed by the US Senate.

Previously, he was General Counsel in the Department of Transport and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), but he had no experience as a prosecutor or officer of the Department of Justice, which is unusual for a candidate for the position of Attorney General.

7 PICTURES

Jeffrey Rosen, candidate for Deputy Attorney General

See gallery

In this image provided by the Department of Transport, Assistant Secretary of Transportation Jeffrey Rosen is represented in his official portrait in Washington. President Donald Trump has appointed Rosen as the next Deputy Attorney General. (Transportation Department via AP)

Jeffrey Rosen, US Secretary of Transportation Donald Trump's Secretary of Transportation, speaks at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Committee on Transportation, Science and Transportation in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 29, 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a member of the standings, said Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception of senators at the White House: "The time may have come for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jeffrey Rosen, candidate for Secretary of Transportation positions for US President Donald Trump, on the right, and Senator Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, arrive at the confirmation hearing of the Senate Transport Committee, Science and Transportation, Washington, DC, Wednesday, March 29. 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a member of the standings, told Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception for Senators of the White House: "The time is up -be well chosen for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jeffrey Rosen, candidate for Secretary of Transportation for US President Donald Trump, right, smiles during the presentation of Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio, at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Committee Transportation, Science and Transportation in Washington, DC, Wednesday. March 29, 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a ranking member, told Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception for Senators at the White House: "The time is may be well chosen for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jeffrey Rosen, US Secretary of Transportation Donald Trump's Secretary of Transportation, speaks at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Committee on Transportation, Science and Transportation in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 29, 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a member of the standings, said Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception of senators at the White House: "The time may have come for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jeffrey Rosen, US Secretary of Transportation Donald Trump's Secretary of Transportation, speaks at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Committee on Transportation, Science and Transportation in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 29, 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a member of the standings, said Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception of senators at the White House: "The time may have come for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jeffrey Rosen, US Secretary of Transportation Donald Trump's Secretary of Transportation, speaks at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Committee on Transportation, Science and Transportation in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 29, 2017. At the hearing, Bill Nelson, a member of the standings, said Vice President Mike Pence last night at a reception of senators at the White House: "The time may have come for us to consider a bill on bipartite infrastructure. " Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

The Ministry of Justice oversees the country's law enforcement and various federal investigations, including the investigation of the US Special Council Office on allegations of Russian interference in the election of 2016 and a possible collusion during Trump's presidential campaign.

Rosenstein drew national attention after Trump's former Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, recused himself from the investigation over Russia, leaving his second to the leadership of the special advocate American Robert Mueller and his team.

Trump, who has repeatedly criticized the sessions for launching a "witch hunt", ousted the sessions in November.

Former FBI interim director, Andrew McCabe, said Tuesday on CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360" show that it was possible that Trump was a Russian asset.

"I think it's possible, I think that's the reason we started our investigation, and I'm really looking forward to seeing where director Mueller will conclude that," he said. .

Trump has repeatedly rejected the accusations against him by McCabe, who said Sunday at CBS "60 Minutes" that Rosenstein had raised the invocation of the 25th amendment of the US Constitution to remove Trump from office in the following months his accession to power.

Rosenstein, who had stopped overseeing Mueller's investigation on Nov. 7, when Trump's acting Attorney General, Matt Whittaker, was to leave shortly after Barr took office. The US Senate confirmed Barr last week.

12 PICTURES

Rod Rosenstein through the years

See gallery

Rod Rosenstein, candidate for Deputy Attorney General, testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the Capitol in Washington on March 7, 2017. REUTERS / Aaron P. Bernstein

US – OCTOBER 10: US Attorney Rod Rosenstein speaks at a press conference in Washington DC on Tuesday October 10, 2006. Rosenstein and US Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty have announced the creation of 39, a national task force on procurement fraud. , the prevention and prosecution of procurement fraud associated with increased contracting activity for national security programs. (Photo by Carol T. Powers / Bloomberg via Getty Images)

US – OCTOBER 10: US Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty, center, speaks at a press conference with Alice Fisher, head of the Criminal Division of the US Department of Justice, left, and the US Attorney Rod Rosenstein at a Press Conference in Washington DC On Tuesday, October 10, 2006, DC McNulty announced the creation of a National Task Force on Purchasing Fraud, which would seek to detect , prevent and prosecute contracting frauds associated with increased contracting activity for national security programs. (Photo by Carol T. Powers / Bloomberg via Getty Images)

SLUG: me / hornsby DATE: August 22, 2006 CREDIT: Ricky Carioti / TWP. United States Federal Courthouse in Greenbelt, Maryland Federal prosecutors announce the indictment of the former superintendent of Prince George County School, Andre Hornsby. US Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, center, along with Francis Turner, left, US Treasury Department and US Deputy Attorney Michael Pauze, announces the indictment of 16 indictments of former superintendent of Prince George County Schools, Andre Hornsby, at a press conference conference at Greenbelt Federal Court on Tuesday. (Photo by Ricky Carioti / The Washington Post / Getty Images)

US Attorney Rod Rosenstein discusses the conviction of Thomas Bromwell Sr. and Mary Patricia Bromwell following their appearance in federal court in Baltimore, Maryland, on Friday, November 16, 2007. (Photo by Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun / MCT via Getty Images)

GREENBELT, MD JUNE 30: Mary J. District Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein Meets with Journalists After Prince George County Councilor Leslie Johnson Guilty Plea in District Court American on June 30, 2011 in Greenbelt, Maryland. Rosenstein's left is Interim Special Agent Jeannine A. Hammett of the Internal Revenue Service, and to his right is Acting Special Agent Richard A. McFeely. from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. (Photo by Mark Gail / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

BALTIMORE, MD – OCTOBER 24: Rod J. Rosenstein, US Attorney, Maryland, Friday October 24, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. Rosenstein said Carl Lackl was to testify about the murder of Larry Haynes, but was killed when Patrick Byers planned his murder in his prison cell. (Photo by Michel du Cille / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Rod Rosenstein, candidate for the position of Deputy Attorney General to US President Donald Trump, listens to a confirmation hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee held in Washington, DC, United States on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. L & # The confirmation hearing for Rosenstein began under the opposite cut of Republicans and Democrats. This should lead to investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and on potential contacts between Moscow and the Trumps campaign team. Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rod Rosenstein, Deputy Attorney General's candidate for US President Donald Trump, sworn in before a confirmation hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee held in Washington, DC, United States, on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. Confirmation Hearing for Rosenstein kicked off as Republicans and Democrats argued over who should conduct the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and potential contacts between the Moscow campaign team and Trumps. Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rod Rosenstein, Deputy Attorney General's candidate for US President Donald Trump, sits at a confirmation hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee held in Washington, DC, United States, on Tuesday, March 7, 2017. L & # 39; Confirmation hearing for Rosenstein began under the opposite cut of Republicans and Democrats. This should lead to investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and on potential contacts between Moscow and the Trumps campaign team. Photographer: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 07: Rod Rosenstein, candidate for the Deputy Attorney General, arrives before the Senate Judiciary Committee to testify on March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. During the hearing, Democratic senators asked Rosenstein to appoint a special prosecutor as part of an ongoing federal inquiry into Russia's influence on the US presidential election. (Photo by Win McNamee / Getty Images)

Rod Rosenstein, candidate for Deputy Attorney General, arrives to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, March 7, 2017. REUTERS / Aaron P. Bernstein




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

"DO NOT" be pushed around "

Rosen was named federal judge by Republican President George W. Bush in 2008, but did not get a confirmation vote in the US Senate, which was under democratic control at the time. He was deemed "well qualified" by the non-partisan association of the American Bar Association.

Thomas Yannucci, a partner at Kirkland & Ellis who has known Rosen since 1982, describes him as a competent court administrator, concerned with ensuring the independence of the Department of Justice.

"No one is going to push Jeff around, he will be determined to do his job," Yannucci said.

Rosen supported the Republican candidates in the last election, although he did not give Trump money, as the federal archives show.

Rosen paid $ 7,545 to Mitt Romney, candidate in the Republican presidential election of 2012, and $ 100 in April 2015 to Marco Rubio, one of Trump's rivals for the Republican nomination of the 2016 campaign.

Rosen has played a key role in efforts to rewrite fuel consumption regulations and define drone policy. He was General Counsel for the Department of Transportation from 2003 to 2006 and Senior Advisor to the OMB from 2006 to 2009. (Reported by Steve Holland and Andy Sullivan, edited by Sandra Maler and Peter Cooney)


Source link