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A NASA scientist asteroid wants to build a telescope to defend the Earth from dangerous space rocks



A NASA scientist wants to build a new telescope to defend the Earth from dangerous space rocks that have annihilated dinosaurs

  • The scientist has proposed to NASA the camera for objects near the Earth (NEOCam)
  • These can search for asteroids via telescopes emitted by heat rather than by light
  • The detection would be more accurate because the light of an asteroid can often be "weak"
  • He could find asteroids earlier and give scientists time to develop a strategy

NASA's top scientist, a top scientist, said the best way to protect the Earth from asteroids is to build a new telescope that can spot them as quickly as possible.

Dr. Amy Mainzer, from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., Said that trying to spot asteroids with current telescopes was tantamount to trying to spot a "coal block in the night sky" .

His team proposed a new system designed to spot large meteors capable of causing significant damage.

This would identify incoming asteroids capable of causing enormous loss of life – just like the meteor that wiped out dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

They claim that it would give scientists more time to develop a strategy for intercepting the rock.

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A NASA scientist said that defending the Earth against dangerous asteroids is to detect them by heat using an infrared telescope called NEOCAM. The comet Catalina (photo) in 2015 was captured by such a telescope called NEOWISE

A NASA scientist said that defending the Earth against dangerous asteroids is to detect them by heat using an infrared telescope called NEOCAM. The comet Catalina (photo) in 2015 was captured by such a telescope called NEOWISE

Dr. Mainzer warned that current telescopes are ineffective at detecting asteroids until it is too late to prevent them from hitting our planet in potentially catastrophic ways.

The Chelyabinsk meteor, which measured only 17 to 20 meters wide, caused extensive ground damage and many injuries when it exploded during the impact with the atmosphere. of Earth in February 2013.

While the asteroid that hit Earth killing dinosaurs about 65 million years ago was about 10 km (6 miles).

Detect these Near-Earth Objects – NEOs mean that such tragedies should not affect humanity, but identifying them at the outset is often the problem.

Dr. Mainzer compared NEO's research in space as the discovery of a "block of coal in the night sky".

She said: "NEOs are intrinsically weak because they are mostly very small and far from us in space.

"Add to that the fact that some of them are as dark as the toner of the printer and it is very difficult to try to spot them in the dark of space."

Dr. Amy Mainzer said that trying to spot asteroids via their "weak" light was tantamount to trying to spot a "coal block in the night sky," but that a camera mission would not help. near-Earth object (NEOCam) (photo) detects heat the waves would make it much more accurate

Dr. Amy Mainzer said that trying to spot asteroids via their "weak" light was tantamount to trying to spot a "coal block in the night sky," but that a camera mission would not help. near-Earth object (NEOCam) (photo) detects heat the waves would make it much more accurate

The new camera, proposed to NASA, would use the latest camera technology to give astronomers enough time to intercept asteroids and comets on a course for the Earth.

This comes after NASA awarded SpaceX of Elon Musk a £ 52.7m ($ 69m) contract to launch a spacecraft to investigate whether asteroids could be ejected from a collision with the Earth.

Dr. Mainzer said, "We are proposing to NASA a new telescope, NEOCam, to do a much more comprehensive job of mapping asteroid locations and measuring their size.

"If we find an object just days away from the impact, it significantly limits our choices. Therefore, in our research efforts, we focused on NEO's research when they are further away from the Earth, thus offering maximum time and greater openness. range of mitigation opportunities.

Dr. Mainzer has proposed to NASA a new NEOCam telescope, which she says could prevent rocks similar to those that annihilate dinosaurs to be a future risk for the Earth. The photo below is a collection of images of the 2305 asteroid King by the WISE probe.

Dr. Mainzer has proposed to NASA a new NEOCam telescope, which she says could prevent rocks similar to those that annihilate dinosaurs to be a future risk for the Earth. The photo below is a collection of images of the 2305 asteroid King by the WISE probe.

Their discoveries made with the NEOWISE (Wide Area-Earth Infrared Infrared Investigator) telescope are essential for the implementation of a strategy of defense against asteroids threatening the Earth.

This includes their takeoff – but the method requires details on the size and composition of the asteroid, in order to calculate its mass.

Dr. Mainzer added that a new telescope could also be used to study ancient comets and asteroids.

She said, "With the NEOWISE mission, we can spot objects of any surface color and use them to measure their sizes and other surface properties.

"These objects are intrinsically interesting because we think that some of them are as old as the original material that made up the solar system.

"One of the things we've discovered is that the composition of the company's senior management is very diverse."

She added that she now wants to take advantage of advances in camera technology to make NEO's research easier.

Dr. Mainzer is the principal investigator of NASA's Asteroid Hunting Mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

She was to present her project to build a new telescope, the Earth-Near-Earth Camera (NEOCam), at the American Physical Society meeting in Denver, USA this month. .

The full report is published in the journal American Physical Society.

WHAT IS THE STRIKE OF CHELYABINSK METEOR?

A meteor that swept over the southern Ural Mountains in February 2013 was the largest meteor strike recorded for more than a century after the Tunguska event in 1908. .

The shockwave of the explosion, which allegedly landed nearly 20 atomic bombs from Hiroshima, injured more than 1,600 people when landing near the city of Chelyabinsk.

The fireball measuring 18 meters wide, roared in the atmosphere of the Earth at 41,600 mph.

Much of the meteor landed in a local lake called Chebarkul.

In addition to the latest discovery, scientists have already discovered more than 12 pieces of Chebarkul Lake since the February 15 incident. However, only five of them proved to be real.

What did they find in meteorites?

The analysis of meteorites recovered from Chelyabinsk revealed an unusual form of jadeite buried in vitreous materials known as shock veins, which form after the rocky collisions, melt and solidify again.

By calculating the rate at which the jadeite must have solidified, the team was able to determine that the asteroid had formed after a collision.

Jadeite, which is one of the minerals of the gemstone jade, is formed only under extreme pressure and at a high temperature.

The jadeite form found in the Chelyabinsk meteorites indicates that the parent body of the asteroid struck another asteroid with a diameter of at least 150 meters (490 ft).

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