Online Support of the WeChat Online Petition for a Woman Chasing the CEO



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Hundreds of people have added their name to an online petition in favor of a University of Minnesota student who claimed to have been raped last August by Richard Liu, president and CEO of the Chinese retailer JD.com.

Chinese-born student Liu Jingyao on Tuesday filed a civil lawsuit in the Minneapolis court against JD's CEO, nearly four months after prosecutors refused to press charges against him.

The lawsuit identified the student for the first time. The two Lius are not linked.

Richard Liu, through his lawyers, maintained his innocence throughout the investigation of the forces of order, which ended in December. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment by e-mail.

It is unclear who initiated the petition, which carried the hashtag #HereForJingyao, although the signatories included Chinese students in foreign universities and in China.

On Saturday, WeChat's social media platform was gaining ground with more than 500 associated names.

"For Liu Jingyao: You are not alone, we believe in survivors, we believe in your courage and your honesty, we will always be at your side, we must join our efforts and walk together to meet the challenge. a culture of blaming rape victims, "said the petition.

A Chinese translation of the indictment was also circulating online.

Liu Jingyao first charged Richard Liu with rape in August while he was traveling to the University of Minnesota to attend a program for Chinese executives.

Liu, 46, who had started JD.com as a modest electronics booth and had developed it to become an eCommerce company generating a net business turnover of $ 67 billion. 2018, was arrested on August 31 but released without charge about 17 hours later.

A nascent # MeToo movement for women's rights has taken a long time to gain ground in China, where issues such as sexual assault have always been ignored.

The ruling Communist Party of China, concerned with the organization of the base, has also lobbied in recent months for activists focusing on issues such as sexual assault on campus and workers' rights.

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