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Raccoon tested positive for rabies, health officials say



The Animal Control Bureau of the Baltimore City Department of Health confirms that a raccoon picked up on Tuesday had been tested positive for rabies. According to the authorities, the raccoon picked up on Schenley Road in the Roland Park area was positive for rabies. According to officials, anyone who has recently come into contact with a raccoon near this location should contact the Bureau of Acute Communicable Diseases at 410-396-4436 during office hours or at 410-396-3100 after hours. Facts about rabies: Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that attacks the nervous system. It is usually transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected animal or by the saliva of an infected animal in an open wound or in the eyes, nose or mouth. Rabies is not spread by stroking a rabid animal or through contact with blood, urine, or faeces (feces) .Offects that are supposed to protect your family and pets from rabies: Have your rabies vaccinated regularly. dogs, your cats and your ferrets. . Enjoy the wildlife away. Teach children to stay away from animals they do not know. Cover garbage cans well and do not leave pet food outside. Prevent bats from entering your home. If you are bitten or exposed to an animal that may be rabid, you should: wash the wound thoroughly immediately with soap and water; if available, use a disinfectant to rinse the wound. Get prompt medical help. Report the exposure to your local health department.

The Animal Control Bureau of the Baltimore City Department of Health confirms that a raccoon picked up on Tuesday had been tested positive for rabies.

According to the authorities, the raccoon picked up on Schenley Road in the Roland Park area was positive for rabies.

According to officials, anyone who has recently come into contact with a raccoon near this location should contact the Bureau of Acute Communicable Diseases at 410-396-4436 during office hours or at 410-396-3100 after hours.

Facts about rabies:

Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that attacks the nervous system. It is usually transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected animal or by the saliva of an infected animal in an open wound or in the eyes, nose or mouth. Rabies is not spread by stroking a rabid animal or by contact with blood, urine or feces.

The officials said to protect your family and pets from rabies:

Get your dogs, cats and ferrets vaccinated regularly.

  • Do not let animals roam freely.
  • Enjoy the wildlife away.
  • Teach children to stay away from animals they do not know.
  • Cover garbage cans well and do not leave pet food outside.
  • Prevent bats from entering your home.

If you are bitten or exposed to an animal that may be rabid, you must:

  • Immediately thoroughly wash the wound with soap and water; if available, use a disinfectant to rinse the wound.
  • Get prompt medical help.
  • Report the exposure to your local health department.

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