Trump calls the New York Times "a real enemy of the people"



President Donald Trump targeted the New York Times on Wednesday morning, calling the newspaper a "real enemy of the people."

Trump routinely attacks "fake media" in general with his tweets and vitriolic speeches, but seldom targets a particular publication or point of sale.

It is widely reported that his post is a response to an article published Tuesday by the Times, in which he described his so-called "two-year war on surrounding investigations".

In a previous tweet, Trump claimed that journalists "did not even call for checks" on articles they planned to publish about his administration – an article also interpreted as an attack on Times reporters.

Times reporter Maggie Haberman, however, rejected this statement in an interview with CNN's "New Day," noting that she had sent several emails to the White House about the planned new "who would was not processed until yesterday. "

"We reviewed a detailed list of what we planned to report," she said. "They chose not to engage and then the president acted with surprise."

"Now that his assistants do not tell him what we're watching or it's a game, he knows what it's about and he claims it's not, I can not read in his thoughts, "she speculated. "We have certainly followed the usual reporting practices and have reviewed them extensively at both the White House and the Department of Justice."

Haberman confirmed that Trump's assertion that the authors did not call for verification was "false". "It's a lie," she said. "And I do not know if he knows it's a lie or if he says to himself" it's true, "if his staff does not tell him we're reaching out, but I find it hard to believe that his staff did not do it. Let him know once again that this kind of report was coming.

Trump's anti-media rhetoric has been accused of the attack by a BBC cameraman at a rally organized by the president in El Paso, Texas earlier this month. He had pushed the crowd "into a frenzy against the media" before the incident, according to a reporter.

45 PICTURES

New York Times print in 1942

See gallery

The press room

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The bullpen

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The telegraphists record the messages in the wire room.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Incoming copy of AP

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Copy the mimeographic despatches of the boys.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Dispatches.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

While the copier is scrambling to meet deadlines, mimeographed mails cover the ground.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The editors can be seen at the Aliens Office throwing stories by "poking" them.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

These publishers are responsible for all stories outside the United States.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

NYT correspondents for Argentina, Switzerland and Mexico.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Brooks Atkinson, drama critic.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Old and new dictionaries.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Head of the "morgue" Tommy Bracken.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A radio operator of the New York Times.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

In the radio room, news is sent to ships in Morse code.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A radio operator records a message from Switzerland.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A cartographer examines the cards before preparing a map of the war in Europe.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The photo department sends photos all over the world.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A negative is inspected in the dark room.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A fashion image is retouched.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

When the carpets are completed, they are checked per page.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Once the page is marked, the completed time is shown next.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A story is typed on a linotype in the composition room.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Notice of change of style.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Linotype slugs are picked up at the table.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A carpet is examined for errors.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A man operates a press of proofs.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A page is prepared for printing in the composition room.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

This man has set the daily index by hand for 15 years.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Evidence posted on the wall.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

As the deadlines get closer, the first page is completed.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The type is defined.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Workers move a paper reel of 1608 pounds.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The paper is fed by the press.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Curved plates are prepared for the press.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The curved plates are assigned the corresponding page number.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The plates are loaded on the press.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

Numbered plates await the press.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The press is almost ready to work.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

And the press is launched!

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The first edition is checked for quality.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The finished papers are cut.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

The completed documents are grouped for delivery.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A truck is loaded with the latest edition of the New York Times.

Photo credit: Library of Congress

A cart is loaded with the finished papers.

Photo credit: Library of Congress




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION


Source link