An asteroid the size of a Big Ben will fly over the Earth tomorrow by flying over at 42020 / hr



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An asteroid the size of Big Ben will fly over the Earth tomorrow, at 42020 km / h.

  • The 2013 asteroid MD8 is expected to fly over Earth Wednesday, NASA announced
  • The space rock has a diameter of almost 280 feet, which rivals the size of Big Ben
  • It will fly over our planet at about 13 lunar distances, just over 3 million miles

A huge asteroid larger than Big Ben should fly over the Earth tomorrow afternoon at a blistering speed of 30,422 miles at the hour.

The asteroid, nicknamed 2013 MD8, is expected to fly over the Earth at just over 3 million miles, about 13 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon, at 12:55 pm Tuesday (ET).

With a diameter close to 280 feet, the MD8 rivals the Big Ben clock tower in its size, which rises to 320 feet.

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The asteroid, nicknamed 2013 MD8, is expected to fly over the Earth at just over 3 million miles, about 13 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon, at 12:55 pm Tuesday (ET).

The asteroid, nicknamed 2013 MD8, is expected to fly over the Earth at just over 3 million miles, about 13 times the distance between the Earth and the Moon, at 12:55 pm Tuesday (ET).

Huge space space should make a "closer approach" to Earth, but its trajectory should make it float safely.

NASA considers that an asteroid is "dangerous" if it lies within 4,600,000 miles of our planet.

The asteroid MD8 belongs to the category of "Near Earth Objects" (NEO), which NASA describes as all the asteroids and comets that revolve around 30 million miles from Earth.

NASA is tracking this object and other Near Earth objects (NEO) to track any potential incoming threats.

However, there is little to worry about, even with MD8 being an object close to the Earth.

The huge asteroid, dubbed 2013 MD8, will pass over the Earth at a dizzying speed of 30,422 miles at the hour. It falls into NASA's category of objects close to the Earth.

The huge asteroid, dubbed 2013 MD8, will pass over the Earth at a dizzying speed of 30,422 miles at the hour. It falls into NASA's category of objects close to the Earth.

With a diameter close to 280 feet, the 2013 Asteroid MD8 rivals the Big Ben clock tower in its size, which peaks at 320 feet. The space rock probably falls into the category of objects close to the Earth

With a diameter close to 280 feet, the 2013 Asteroid MD8 rivals the Big Ben clock tower in its size, which peaks at 320 feet. The space rock probably falls into the category of objects close to the Earth

"No humans in the last 1000 years have been killed by a meteorite or by the impact of an impact," said NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists.

"NASA does not know any asteroid or comet currently colliding with the Earth. The probability of a major collision is therefore very low.

"In fact, as far as we know, no large object is likely to hit Earth at any time in the next hundred years," they continued.

The agency estimates that of the 600,000 known asteroids in our solar system, about 16,000 are near-Earth objects.

The MD8 also falls under the category of "potentially dangerous objects", ie those which reach a minimum distance of less than 0.05 on the ground and have an absolute magnitude (H) of 22.0 or more luminous.

The 2013 asteroid MD8 has an absolute magnitude of 24.2.

WHAT CAN WE DO TO STOP A COLLIDANT ASTEROID WITH EARTH?

At the present time, NASA could not deflect an asteroid back to Earth, but it could mitigate its impact and take action to protect lives and property.

This would include the evacuation of the area of ​​impact and the relocation of key infrastructure.

Learn more about trajectory, size, shape, mass, composition and rotation dynamics of the orbit would help experts determine the severity of a potential impact.

However, the solution to mitigate the damage is to detect any potential threat as soon as possible.

NASA is moving forward with a spaceship the size of a refrigerator that can prevent asteroids from hitting the Earth. A test with a small non-threatening asteroid is planned for 2024.

This is the very first mission to demonstrate an asteroid deflection technique for planetary defense.

The double asteroid redirection test (DART) uses what is known as a kinetic impactor technique, that is, which strikes the asteroid to change its orbit.

The impact would change the speed of an asteroid threatening to a small fraction of its total speed, but doing so, well before the expected impact, that little boost goes away. add up over time to cause significant displacement of the asteroid away from the Earth.

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